2016: Issue 2

journal-cover-2016-2Dear Reader,

Welcome to the second issue for 2016!  It features papers from Canada, USA, Australia, New Zealand and Austria. These include creative contemporary uses of externalising conversations with children, adults facing fear, and men who have been violent to female partners.

We’re also pleased to publish here:

– A narrative therapy paper that explores how collective considerations of moving from ‘disorder’ to political action can assist women who express concerns about eating and their bodies
– A rigorous and innovative new narrative methodology using the metaphor of the bicycle
– And one of the first papers in relation to narrative practice and gaming

It’s another diverse collection. Delightfully, this is the first time we have published papers by any of the authors featured here. It is always exciting when new authors appear in the field.

Warmly
Cheryl White

 

Contents

‘From ‘disorder’ to political action: Conversations that invite collective considerations to individual experiences of women who express concerns about eating and their bodies’ Kristina J. Lainson. (Pages 1-16)

‘Exploring the bicycle metaphor as a vehicle for rich story development: A collective narrative practice project’ Marc F. Leger. (Pages 17-35)

‘Divorcing the voice of fear: A collaborative, narrative approach to anxiety’ Evalie Horner and Patrick Davey Tully. (Pages 37-43)

‘Troublemaker Cards: Promoting the language of responsibility and prevention in men’s domestic violence’ Ryan Greenwell. (Pages 44-55)

‘Playing and narrative therapy: Combining views from psychotherapy and occupational therapy in work with children’ Christine Ullmann. (Pages 56-64)

‘What’s in a Game? Narrative therapy approaches with people who have relationships with gaming and online communities’ Dale Andersen-Giberson. (Pages 65-75)

  • From ‘disorder’ to political action: conversations that invite collective considerations to individual experiences of women who express concerns about eating and their bodies — Kristina Lainson

    $9.90

    This article describes an interweaving of narrative practices which has proved helpful for a number of women experiencing concerns about eating and its effects on their bodies. Through the stories of two young women, this paper illustrates how, by inviting collective ideas to individual experiences, and by recognising and naming their own commitments and agentive responses to societal expectations, the women became able to move away from ideas of ‘stuckness’ towards a sense of themselves as influential both in their own lives and possibly in the lives of others similarly concerned.


  • Exploring the bicycle metaphor as a vehicle for rich story development: A collective narrative practice project— Marc F. Leger

    $9.90

    This practice-based paper describes a step-by-step outline of a form of collective narrative practice which uses the bicycle as its central metaphor. A significant theme in this collective narrative practice methodology is an interest in attending to individual and collective experiences of place, and to the possibilities that place-based narrative enquiries can provide in eliciting rich accounts of people’s local knowledges and contribute to a ‘re-inhabiting’ of the significant social geographies of people’s lives.


  • Divorcing the voice of fear: A collaborative, narrative approach to anxiety by Evalie Horner and Patrick Davey Tully

    $9.90

    Co-created by a therapist, Evalie Horner, and her client, Patrick Davey Tully, this paper introduces and explores narrative therapy as an approach for addressing issues of anxiety. The paper alternates voices between Horner and Tully as they embark upon and develop their therapeutic relationship. After reviewing a variety of other treatment approaches, they bring the reader into their joint process of narrative therapy, from inception through to the present day. Horner and Tully illustrate the tools they use to deconstruct various discourses and social constructions of truth, including externalisation via the creation of distinct, representative character voices. They discuss how narrative therapy connects past experiences to the present. And they show how narrative therapy engages the client in a pro-active, co-creative process.


  • Troublemaker Cards: Promoting the language of responsibility and prevention in men’s domestic violence— Ryan Greenwell

    $9.90

    This paper describes the use of Troublemaker Cards in men’s domestic violence behaviour change groups as an innovative approach to expose and challenge the dominant ways of being and thinking that support men’s violence and abuse towards women. While language that minimises men’s responsibility-taking for their actions is available and ubiquitous, the Troublemaker Cards offer an alternative, and promote the gendered and political understandings of violence and abuse in a respectful parallel journey of discovery. The externalising language used on the cards keeps the men’s identities separate from these discourses, and yet supports an attentiveness to their relationship with them. Guided by the cards in a ‘cool engagement’, the men are invited to explore and deconstruct the Troublemakers as well as build the foundations for second-story development. Evidence from practice suggests that once men experience this separation and foresee alternative territories to step into, they can better describe their relationship with the ‘Troublemakers’ in a ‘hot engagement’. In a context of accountability to women and children, the men create opportunities to propose how they will prevent potential future abuses and take action based on preferred relationships to the Troublemakers, such that they are not unwittingly reproducing dominant ways of being.


  • Playing and narrative therapy: Synthesising narrative practice and occupational therapy in work with children— Christine Ullmann

    $9.90

    This article explores combining occupational therapy with practices from narrative therapy. The contexts of play allows a site for working with both children’s physical challenges, as well as dominant problem stories. Throughout the paper, examples of work with individual children show the links between occupational and narrative practices, specifically in relation to situating problems outside of children, the use of scaffolding both conversations and physical challenges, and developing alternative stories that help children renegotiate relationships with the problems in their lives.


  • What’s in a game? Narrative therapy approaches with people who have relationships with gaming and online communities— Dale Andersen-Giberson

    $9.90

    This article outlines various approaches in working with people who have relationships with gaming and online communities, and includes transcripts to share the co-learning that unfolded in narrative conversations. Discoveries include the helpfulness of using narrative therapy to enlist positioning around gaming and the vast possibilities that exist for unpacking the significance of online communities as arenas for preferred identity construction.