2009

Posted by on Dec 7, 2016 in | 0 comments

Showing 17–26 of 26 results

  • Finding resiliency, standing tall: Exploring trauma, hardship, and healing with refugees— Michael Boucher

    $9.90

    This document records some of the traumas and hardships faced by refugees living in Rochester, New York. Along with the effects of these hardships, the document also records the accomplishments that refugees have made, and how refugee communities resist the effects of trauma and hardship, as well as what sustains them. Finally, the document records some things the refugees wanted people working in social services, as well as members of the broader community, to know about refugee experience. This document was prepared using methodologies and ideas from collective narrative practice, including collective narrative timelines, collective narrative documents, ‘double-listening’, and recruiting audiences.

  • Is It Good to Be ‘Grey’ in the Therapy Room?: The Politics of Religion and Religious Culture in the Therapeutic Context— Josie McSkimming

    $9.90

    This paper explores some dilemmas, ethical considerations, and ideas for therapeutic practice in contexts where clients may be experiencing some questions in relation to religion, specifically Christianity. Through engaging with Foucault’s notions of ‘subjugated knowledges’, ‘projects of genealogies’, ‘the Gaze’, and ‘power/knowledge’, the author suggests options for nuanced identity projects of reclamation in contexts of power and subjugation.

  • Narrative Explorations in Clinical Health Psychology— Rob Whittaker

    $9.90

    This paper documents the author’s experience as a clinical psychologist using narrative approaches with people living with diabetes. The paper begins by contrasting narrative and poststructuralist approaches with those of contemporary clinical health psychology, and gives some background on diabetes and the broader challenges this can bring to people’s lives. Three narrative practices are then explored in relation to diabetes: externalising conversations, re-authoring conversations, and practices of circulation. This last practice is shown through a number of letters written to the referring community nurse in a regional diabetes service, but also serving as therapeutic documents for the person who consulted with the author.

  • Shaping Narrative Therapy to Fit Local Cultures— Linda Moxley-Haegert

    $9.90

    Many community-minded families in Newfoundland seem to have difficulty with traditional therapies that are interpretative or directive. In a search for a therapeutic approach that might fit better with these clients’ world-views and complement their traditional manner of self-healing, narrative therapy was found. This paper presents one Newfoundland family’s story and the reasons for concluding that certain narrative practices are very appropriate for community-minded families. The author’s move to Montreal, Quebec, and her experiences there, have suggested that narrative therapy using different narrative practices could also be a fit for families who have lost or become detached from a community. A story of an immigrant Italian family is provided.

  • A Multiplicity of Desire: Polyamory and Relationship Counselling— Barbara Baumgartner

    $5.50

    Reflecting on a personal and professional journey, this paper invites readers to consider prevailing ideas of monogamy and its effects on relationship counselling. The term and practice of polyamory are introduced, highlighting how society’s training in monogamy obscures this choice. An interview with experience consultants challenges some of the myths of polyamorous relationships and makes suggestions for counsellors.

  • Opening up a Crack: An Account of Narrative Practice in the Context of Pastoral Therapy— Kim Barker

    $9.90

    This paper explores some of the possibilities and challenges of therapeutic conversations with people who hold strong religious beliefs and/or find themselves under the influence of oppressive religious discourse. With particular reference to one woman’s therapy journey, it shows how the articulation and deconstruction of one’s ‘belief story’, in the absence of any prescriptive or proscriptive constraints, can render visible various possible entry points into alternative storylines.

  • Team Garra: Using the Team of Life to facilitate conversations with Brazilians living in Sydney— Viviane Oliveira

    $9.90

    This paper outlines an application of the ‘rites of passage’ and ‘migration of identity’ metaphors from narrative therapy and community work, in conversations with Brazilian immigrants in Australia. The author also employed the ‘Team of Life’ methodology, which was highly culturally-relevant, given the Brazilian people’s love of soccer/football, as well as the ‘narrative timelines’ methodology and ‘definitional ceremony’ map of narrative practice.

  • Is This Sex Addiction?: Questioning ‘Sex Addiction’ in Therapeutic Counselling Conversations— Ash Rehn

    $9.90

    This paper examines the concept of ‘sex addiction’, and its increasing popularity since the emergence of AIDS in gay communities in the 1980s. Adopting narrative therapy’s ethical orientations of decentred yet influential positioning, and being in a ‘lifelong apprenticeship’, the author worked with a number of men to renegotiate their relationship with ‘sex addiction’ in their lives. This work included various maps of narrative practice, including the Statement of Position Map / externalising conversations, re-membering conversations, the absent but implicit, and deconstructive conversations.

  • Snakes and Ladders: The Ups and Downs of a Self-harming Lifestyle— Diane Clare

    $9.90

    This paper describes work with Jay, a woman who, after experiencing abuse as a child, engaged in acts of extreme self-harm in later life. The work involved a range of health care staff acting as a reflecting team, using outsider-witness practices of narrative therapy. To ensure that this apparently high number of resources used could be justified within the context of budget-conscious health services, the author developed the idea of clearly calculating and reporting on the ‘economix’ of the approach. The article also outlines the practice of ‘bookmarking’ with clients, which became a pivotal practice. The paper concludes with a poignant and reflective postscript given the tragic event of Jay’s death at her own hand.

  • Tales of travels across languages: Languages and their anti-languages— Marcela Polanco and David Epston

    $9.90

    This paper is a collaboration between an apprentice bilingual translator/narrative therapist (Marcela) and one of the originators of narrative therapy (David). Studies of translation and bilingualism offer interesting and useful contributions to the renewal of narrative therapy. As narrative ideas migrate cultures, these crossings can enrich, acculturate, and diversify narrative practices. At the same time, considerations of bilinguality or multilinguality can influence our practice within languages. The example of therapeutic practice that is offered illustrates how narrative therapeutic conversations can move between and across multiple namings of people’s predicaments. In this process, understandings need not be ironed out, as often happens in monolingual conversations. Instead, multilinguality puts names in play as transitory constructions, susceptible to renewal or reinvention.

1,962 Comments

  1. “Narrative therapy doesn’t believe in a ‘whole self’ which needs to be integrated but rather that our identities are made up of many stories, and that these stories are constantly changing.”

    I like this, I find it very compatible with my beliefs as a Buddhist. In Buddhism, as I understand it, mistaken beliefs about a solid, fixed “self” are the source of our suffering.

    I work with couples using EFT for couples, and in that approach, there is a big emphasis on externalising the problem as “the cycle that you get trapped in”, and encouraging couples to come up with their own name for it.

  2. Thank you for this. I am a counsellor, and trying to make as much as possible of my notes “in quotes”, that is, writing down things that the clients said. And not my own opinions.

  3. hello

    I the ED of a Friendship Center in Terrace, BC where were mostly target the indigenous population in our city of 12,000. I found your video interesting and something that we may want to try. Havee you been able to to do any follow ups studies to gage the long term effect of your program?

    Regards

    Cal Albright
    ED
    Kermode Friendship Center
    http://www.keremodefriendship.ca
    Terrace, BC
    Canada

  4. Thank you for this overview of Narrative Therapy. I am returning to practice after some time away, and these reminders are timely and appreciated.

  5. Hi Chris

    I really enjoyed watching your video about Narrative Walks. My project is based in Blaenau Gwent, in South Wales, Uk. I’m wondering whether I might use such an approach in my work with our Youth Service, who support young people between the ages of 11 and 25. Have you any thoughts on this? Are there any resources available, either free or to purchase?

    Best wishes

    Paul

    • Hi Paul, m

      Much of my early attempts of the program were with the 15-20 year old age bracket and I found it worked really well. When I recently had an opportunity to run the program again with this age bracket – I extended the finish time so that could spend more time at the stop points and have a fire at the last resting place to talk about our intentions after the walk. This meant that we used head torches for the 2km which added a bit of a sense of theatre to the day. It was pretty cool.

      If you email me on hello@embarkpsych.com I can send you the manual. Or ask any other questions via this page so others might share in the answers.

      CD

  6. Thank you for sharing your insights. This has been very enlightening as a student studying post-grad social work. Recently my tutorial group was discussing how professionals often use their interpretation and that clients may not get to see how some professionals interpret their stories, in this way many things can be missed especially what the client sees as being important.

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