2019: Issue 2

Posted by on Jul 16, 2019 in | 0 comments

Editorial

Dear Reader,

I hope this year is treating you well so far. Here in Adelaide it’s mid-winter so the first paper of this issue is very appropriate! It’s called Winter Stories: Therapeutic conversations from the land of ice and snow.   

It opens a journal issue that includes a diverse collection of papers. The second section comprises of a series of interviews and resources exploring forms of narrative practice beyond the gender binary. First up is an interview with Esben Esther Pirelli Benestad that explores realms of bodily adjustments, gender belonging, resting places and gender talents. Secondly, David Nylund describes the narrative family therapy that he conducts with trans children and cisgender parents. This is followed by a collective document gathered by Tiffany Sostar and Rosie Maeder in relation to ‘Non binary Superpowers’! This conveys a collaborative conversation between non-binary youth in Adelaide, South Australia and non-binary youth in Calgary, Alberta. And finally in this section, we have included a resource that we use here at Dulwich Centre in relation to talking about pronouns and gendered language. We hope this may be of assistance to others in different contexts – or that it might inspire you to create your own.

The final section of this journal issue features a number of narrative practice papers from Australia, Turkey and Canada. They explore narrative approaches to single sessions trauma work; working with online gamers, responding to grief and loss using therapeutic documents, and re-storying children’s nightmares and night terrors.

We hope these papers are helpful to you and those with whom you work.

Warm regards (from chilly Adelaide).

Cheryl White

Contents

1-10 Winter stories: Therapeutic conversations from the land of ice and snow, by Julie Tilsen

11-15 ‘Some of us have a body that we need to adjust in order for the m to be a good place to live’: Belonging, resting places and gender talents. An interview with Esben Esther Pirelli Benestad. The interviewer was David Denborough

16-23 Moments to treasure: Narrative family therapy with trans children and cisgender parents. An interview with David Nylund by David Denborough

24-32 Non-binary Superpowers! A collaborative conversation between non-binary youth in Adelaide, South Australia, and non-binary youth in Calgary, Alberta. Co-facilitated by Rosie Maeder and Tiffany Sostar. Written up by Tiffany Sostar

33-39 She/he/they/ze/hir: Talking about pronouns and gendered language, by Rosie Maeder, Tiffany Sostar and David Denborough

40-48 Narrative therapy approaches in single-session trauma work, by Amelia Batrouney

49-58 Living like playing: Working with online gamers from a narrative therapy perspective, by Mehmet Dinç

59-67 Responding to grief and loss using therapeutic documents, by Karen Esakin Mittet

68-79 Re-storying children’s nightmares and night terrors, by Kelvin F. Mutter

Showing all 9 results

  • Winter stories: Therapeutic conversations from the land of ice and snow — Julie Tilsen

    $9.90

    People living in colder climates often diagnose themselves with ‘winter depression’ or ‘seasonal affective disorder’ when they experience sadness, low energy, fatigue and other difficulties that they attribute to the cold and dark days of winter. There are limitations to locating these problems only in bodily and medical discourses and ignoring the culture-bound ways these discourses are constructed and circulated through the kinds of stories we tell about winter. I use a narrative approach to these problems, inviting people to remember their childhood relationships with winter, and to situate their experiences in context, thus making new ways forward possible. When their childhood winter stories become available, people reconnect with a history that helps them construct preferred relationships with winter.

  • ‘Some of us have a body that we need to adjust in order for them to be a good place to live’: Belonging, resting places and gender talents — Esben Esther Pirelli Benestad

    $5.50

    This paper describes the application of the dialectical narrative inquiry, a therapeutic approach that incorporates phenomenology and narrative inquiry within narrative practices in order to elicit double-storied accounts of people’s lives. I describe this approach through my work with Sarah, a 28-year-old university student who had been experiencing difficulties in her interpersonal relationships. Sarah and I were able to develop her personal dialectic, chart her landscapes through re-authoring questions, and clarify her positions regarding her problematic and preferred responses to experiences of ‘Ambivalence and Insensitivity’. Through the use of macro-scaffolding over subsequent sessions, Sarah and I were able to identify her personal values and her hopes and intentions for the future. We also identified specific barriers to enacting these preferences, and personal skills and knowledges that she would be able to draw on in order to move towards her hopes and intentions for the future.

  • Moments to treasure: Narrative family therapy with trans children and cisgender parents — David Nylund

    $5.50

    David Nylund’s primary work is at the Gender Health Center in Sacramento, California, with family members, caregivers, and parents of young trans and gender diverse folks. David works primarily with parents to invite them to come to a place of supporting and affirming their child’s gender identity. This interview explores the ways in which he engages in narrative family therapy in this context.

  • Non-binary Superpowers! A collaborative conversation between non-binary youth in Adelaide, South Australia, and non-binary youth in Calgary, Alberta — Rosie Maeder and Tiffany Sostar

    $5.50

    A common experience of folks who identify outside of binary gender is that of erasure, an experience of not being seen, fighting daily to ‘prove’ that our identities and experiences are ‘real’ and ‘valid’. In April and May of 2019, two small groups of Trans and Non-Binary (enby) young people and some of their loved ones came together on opposite sides of the world. Tiffany Sostar (they/them) and Rosie Maeder (she/her) hosted narrative conversations in Adelaide, Australia, and Calgary, Canada, and linked them through a collective document. This was the beginning of an ongoing trans-continental conversation exploring the skills, knowledges and experiences of Non-Binary young people and of the ways they are or hope to be seen and supported by loved ones. Tiffany and Rosie hoped to draw out rich, multi-storied accounts of Non-Binary experiences and to make visible the skills, knowledges and complicated superpowers required to resist rigid constructs of gender. They seek to further subvert Non-Binary invisibility by sharing these stories with other enby folks and anyone else who wants to learn more about Non-Binary experiences or identities ‒ including and especially Narrative Practitioners who work with Trans and Non-Binary young people.

  • She/he/they/ze/hir: Talking about pronouns and gendered language — Rosie Maeder, Tiffany Sostar and David Denborough

    $5.50

    When participants arrive at a workshop at Dulwich Centre, they are invited to indicate their pronoun(s) on their name tag. As this practice is new to many people, this resource explains what it’s all about, why we care about this, and how readers can join in this collaborative project.

  • Narrative therapy approaches in single-session trauma work — Amelia Batrouney

    $5.50

    This paper outlines opportunities to incorporate narrative approaches in single-session telephone counselling, with a particular focus on working with women who have experienced sexual violence. Practices described include externalising the problem, deconstruction, re-authoring, double listening, double-story development and re-membering conversations.

  • Living like playing: Working with online gamers from a narrative therapy perspective — Mehmet Dinc

    $9.90

    Many young people and their parents experience ongoing conflict about online gaming. These conflicts can lead to shame, distance and decreased self-esteem for young people. This paper explores the use of co-research, re-authoring, therapeutic documents and other narrative practices for working with young people experiencing issues with and conflict about online gaming.

  • Responding to grief and loss using therapeutic documents — Karen Esakin Mittet

    $5.50

    This article demonstrates some of the healing practices that narrative therapists have available to them when helping people who are grieving the death of someone they love. It emphasises the healing effects of therapeutic documentation and the significance of effective note taking when preparing therapeutic letters for individuals who have been bereaved.

  • Re-storying children’s nightmares and night terrors — Kelvin F. Mutter

    $9.90

    Nightmares and night terrors are common childhood experiences. Through the use of first-person narrative and composite stories, this essay documents an emergent incorporation of narrative therapy practices in work with families seeking help for children experiencing nightmares and night terrors. Key transitions and innovations in clinical practice are identified. Reflections identify and discuss potential success factors and limitations regarding the outcomes of this practice. This paper concludes by identifying and reflecting on three novel outcomes that emerge from the paper.

1,962 Comments

  1. “Narrative therapy doesn’t believe in a ‘whole self’ which needs to be integrated but rather that our identities are made up of many stories, and that these stories are constantly changing.”

    I like this, I find it very compatible with my beliefs as a Buddhist. In Buddhism, as I understand it, mistaken beliefs about a solid, fixed “self” are the source of our suffering.

    I work with couples using EFT for couples, and in that approach, there is a big emphasis on externalising the problem as “the cycle that you get trapped in”, and encouraging couples to come up with their own name for it.

  2. Thank you for this. I am a counsellor, and trying to make as much as possible of my notes “in quotes”, that is, writing down things that the clients said. And not my own opinions.

  3. hello

    I the ED of a Friendship Center in Terrace, BC where were mostly target the indigenous population in our city of 12,000. I found your video interesting and something that we may want to try. Havee you been able to to do any follow ups studies to gage the long term effect of your program?

    Regards

    Cal Albright
    ED
    Kermode Friendship Center
    http://www.keremodefriendship.ca
    Terrace, BC
    Canada

  4. Thank you for this overview of Narrative Therapy. I am returning to practice after some time away, and these reminders are timely and appreciated.

  5. Hi Chris

    I really enjoyed watching your video about Narrative Walks. My project is based in Blaenau Gwent, in South Wales, Uk. I’m wondering whether I might use such an approach in my work with our Youth Service, who support young people between the ages of 11 and 25. Have you any thoughts on this? Are there any resources available, either free or to purchase?

    Best wishes

    Paul

    • Hi Paul, m

      Much of my early attempts of the program were with the 15-20 year old age bracket and I found it worked really well. When I recently had an opportunity to run the program again with this age bracket – I extended the finish time so that could spend more time at the stop points and have a fire at the last resting place to talk about our intentions after the walk. This meant that we used head torches for the 2km which added a bit of a sense of theatre to the day. It was pretty cool.

      If you email me on hello@embarkpsych.com I can send you the manual. Or ask any other questions via this page so others might share in the answers.

      CD

  6. Thank you for sharing your insights. This has been very enlightening as a student studying post-grad social work. Recently my tutorial group was discussing how professionals often use their interpretation and that clients may not get to see how some professionals interpret their stories, in this way many things can be missed especially what the client sees as being important.

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