Alice Morgan

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in | 0 comments

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  • Group Work with Women Who Have Experienced Violence— Jacqui Morse & Alice Morgan

    $9.90

    In working with women who have experienced violence in heterosexual relationships, groups provide the opportunity for linking lives around shared themes, values and commitments. The work described in this paper utilises narrative practices to highlight the context of women’s lives, to centre women’s knowledge, to locate responsibility, to accentuate alternative and preferred descriptions of identity, and to build connections between women. Specific attention is also paid to deconstruct dominant gender discourses.

  • Discerning between structuralist and non-structuralist categories of identity: a training exercise— Alice Morgan

    $5.50

    Through the description of a training exercise, this paper illustrates the relevance of assisting trainees to discern between structuralist and non structuralist categories of identity. This piece assumes knowledge of various narrative therapy concepts. If you are not familiar with these, recommended reading is offered at the end of the paper.

  • Beginning to use a narrative approach in therapy— Alice Morgan

    $5.50

    We invited Alice Morgan to write the following article for this first edition of our new journal. Over the years we have had many requests for writings that describe the process of beginning to engage with narrative ideas and practices. Within the following paper Alice describes some of the ways in which she began to engage with narrative ideas and what she found helpful in the process. We believe that this piece will be of interest to those who are new to narrative ideas, and also to those who are teachers and trainers. Alice is the author of the very popular book ‘What is Narrative Therapy? An easy-to-read introduction’ (2000) and editor of ‘Once Upon a Time … Narrative therapy with children and their families’ (1999).

1,962 Comments

  1. “Narrative therapy doesn’t believe in a ‘whole self’ which needs to be integrated but rather that our identities are made up of many stories, and that these stories are constantly changing.”

    I like this, I find it very compatible with my beliefs as a Buddhist. In Buddhism, as I understand it, mistaken beliefs about a solid, fixed “self” are the source of our suffering.

    I work with couples using EFT for couples, and in that approach, there is a big emphasis on externalising the problem as “the cycle that you get trapped in”, and encouraging couples to come up with their own name for it.

  2. Thank you for this. I am a counsellor, and trying to make as much as possible of my notes “in quotes”, that is, writing down things that the clients said. And not my own opinions.

  3. hello

    I the ED of a Friendship Center in Terrace, BC where were mostly target the indigenous population in our city of 12,000. I found your video interesting and something that we may want to try. Havee you been able to to do any follow ups studies to gage the long term effect of your program?

    Regards

    Cal Albright
    ED
    Kermode Friendship Center
    http://www.keremodefriendship.ca
    Terrace, BC
    Canada

  4. Thank you for this overview of Narrative Therapy. I am returning to practice after some time away, and these reminders are timely and appreciated.

  5. Hi Chris

    I really enjoyed watching your video about Narrative Walks. My project is based in Blaenau Gwent, in South Wales, Uk. I’m wondering whether I might use such an approach in my work with our Youth Service, who support young people between the ages of 11 and 25. Have you any thoughts on this? Are there any resources available, either free or to purchase?

    Best wishes

    Paul

    • Hi Paul, m

      Much of my early attempts of the program were with the 15-20 year old age bracket and I found it worked really well. When I recently had an opportunity to run the program again with this age bracket – I extended the finish time so that could spend more time at the stop points and have a fire at the last resting place to talk about our intentions after the walk. This meant that we used head torches for the 2km which added a bit of a sense of theatre to the day. It was pretty cool.

      If you email me on hello@embarkpsych.com I can send you the manual. Or ask any other questions via this page so others might share in the answers.

      CD

  6. Thank you for sharing your insights. This has been very enlightening as a student studying post-grad social work. Recently my tutorial group was discussing how professionals often use their interpretation and that clients may not get to see how some professionals interpret their stories, in this way many things can be missed especially what the client sees as being important.

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