Cheryl White

Posted by on Nov 29, 2016 in | 0 comments

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  • Stories from Srilanka: Responding to the Tsunami— Shanti Arulampalam, Lara Perera, Sathis de Mel, Cheryl White and David Denborough

    $9.90

    This paper consists of a series of extracts from interviews from Sri Lankan community workers and psychosocial workers who are involved in responding to the aftermath of the tsunamis of December 2004. Three months after the tsunamis had devastated areas of Sri Lanka’s coastline, Cheryl White and David Denborough visited the country and witnessed the extent of the destruction and loss of life, and also the extent of the reconstruction efforts. They met with families who are now living in small tents one hundred metres back from the shore and are gradually piecing life back together again. Because it was exactly three months to the day of the tsunami, Buddhist remembrance ceremonies were being held in many parts of the country. A number of interviews were conducted with thoughtful and dedicated local organisations determined to hold onto and utilise local knowledge and expertise in responding to the experience of Sri Lankan communities. This paper includes stories from a number of these organisations.

  • A Letter to the Feminism Project— co-ordinated by Shona Russell, Maggie Carey & Cheryl White

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    The paper, ‘Feminism, therapy and narrative ideas – Exploring some not so commonly asked questions’, compiled by Shona Russell and Maggie Carey, was published in an earlier edition of the International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work (2003 #2) and heralded the beginning of an ongoing project on this theme. Subsequent articles by Judy Wright (2003): ‘Considering issues of domestic violence and abuse in palliative care and bereavement settings’; and ‘The Mother-Daughter Project: cocreating pro-girl, pro-mother culture through adolescence and beyond’ by SuEllen Hamkins, Renee Schultz et al. (2003), represent ongoing explorations of these issues.

    If you were not a subscriber to the International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work in 2003 it is possible to receive back issues (just contact your local distributer). A number of these feminist-informed papers are also available on the Dulwich Centre website: www.dulwichcentre.com.au

  • Community Therapy: A Participatory Response to Psychic Misery— Adalberto Barreto & Marilene Grandesso

    $9.90

    This collection introduces ‘community therapy’ which has been developed in Brazil to respond to various forms of social suffering and ‘psychic misery’. The collection includes an introduction to the history, key tasks, and stages of a community therapy gathering; a description of one example of a community therapy meeting; and a brief exploration of how ideas from narrative therapy have been introduced into community therapy practices.

    Note: includes reflections by David Denborough and Cheryl White

     

  • A storyline of collective narrative practice: a history of ideas, social projects and partnerships— David Denborough

    $9.90

    Collective narrative practice is an emerging field. Building on the thinking and practice foundations of narrative therapy, collective narrative practice seeks to respond to groups and communities who have experienced significant social suffering in contexts in which ‘therapy’ may not be culturally resonant. This paper tells a story of this emerging field. It describes the author’s journey through the intellectual history of six key aspects of narrative therapy as well as richly describing a range of social projects and partnerships. In doing so, this paper provides an historical foundation to the emerging field of collective narrative practice.

  • History Shaping the Present: from an interview with Marlene Silbert

    $5.50

    In this piece, Marlene Silbert, the Education Director of the Holocaust Museum in Cape Town, South Africa, describes ways of teaching history that make it relevant to the present. In particular, Marlene describes ways of engaging with Holocaust history that can enable action and healing in present day South Africa. This piece is derived from an interview. Cheryl White, David Denborough and Peter Hollams were present.

1,959 Comments

  1. Thank you for this overview of Narrative Therapy. I am returning to practice after some time away, and these reminders are timely and appreciated.

  2. Hi Chris

    I really enjoyed watching your video about Narrative Walks. My project is based in Blaenau Gwent, in South Wales, Uk. I’m wondering whether I might use such an approach in my work with our Youth Service, who support young people between the ages of 11 and 25. Have you any thoughts on this? Are there any resources available, either free or to purchase?

    Best wishes

    Paul

    • Hi Paul, m

      Much of my early attempts of the program were with the 15-20 year old age bracket and I found it worked really well. When I recently had an opportunity to run the program again with this age bracket – I extended the finish time so that could spend more time at the stop points and have a fire at the last resting place to talk about our intentions after the walk. This meant that we used head torches for the 2km which added a bit of a sense of theatre to the day. It was pretty cool.

      If you email me on hello@embarkpsych.com I can send you the manual. Or ask any other questions via this page so others might share in the answers.

      CD

  3. Thank you for sharing your insights. This has been very enlightening as a student studying post-grad social work. Recently my tutorial group was discussing how professionals often use their interpretation and that clients may not get to see how some professionals interpret their stories, in this way many things can be missed especially what the client sees as being important.

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