domestic violence

Posted by on Nov 10, 2016 in | 0 comments

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  • From Oppression, Resistance Grows— Holly Loveday

    $9.90

    This paper explores the author’s use of narrative practices with women experiencing domestic abuse, and looks at how, despite living in a broader environment of secrecy and threat, women’s voices and stories can be honoured and a place of refuge can become one of laughter and celebration. The paper explores women’s reflections on their experiences of counselling and group work, examples of externalising conversations, therapeutic letters, and conversations employing the migration of identity metaphor.

  • Responding to Men’s Violence: An interview with Nancy Gray

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    In their work with men who have enacted violence against their partners, a team of workers at New Start, in Halifax, Canada, draws upon the metaphor of ‘migration of identity’ to assist men to move away from violence and domination and towards different forms of masculinity. In this thoughtful and reflective two-part interview, Nancy Gray describes some of the key ideas that inform their work. The first part of the interview conveys how the migration of identity map and the re-authoring conversations map can be put to work with men who are violent. It also conveys some of the unexpected discoveries that emerge as a result. The interviewer was David Denborough.

  • Thwarting Shame: Feminist engagement in group work with men recruited to patriarchal dominance in relationship— Kylie Dowse

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    Through the eyes of an Aboriginal feminist, this paper documents group work with men who have used violence in intimate relationship. Adapting narrative externalising techniques to scaffold a conceptual support group for Shame enabled men engaged in group work to view responsibility and respect in new ways. The paper considers the role of women facilitators in working with men, and ways the politics of women’s experience add value to group discussion.

  • Documents of Knowledge About Violence from African Nova Scotian Communities

    $5.50

    Members of North End Halifax and East Preston, two African Nova Scotian communities, have been meeting together to talk about violence and ways of addressing it in their context, and in their ways. Included here are key documents that have been created from these conversations.

    These include:

    •   ‘Some key knowledge and ideas about violence in African Nova Scotian communities’ from women representing North End Halifax and East Preston
    •   ‘Principles in relation to responding to violence in African Nova Scotian Communities’
    •   ‘Men speaking out to prevent abuse’ & ‘A Brother’s food for thought’ from the men of the communities of East Preston and North Preston.

    These documents have been circulated throughout the communities to spark further conversation and action on these issues.

  • Narrative Therapy Outcomes for Women who have Experienced Domestic Violence— Emma Bullen

    $9.90

    Debate continues about what constitutes evidence for outcomes of psychological interventions. There are challenges to operationalise research for post-modernist views of knowledge being multiple and relative rather than singular, fixed, and absolute. This has led to limited empirical evaluation of practices such as narrative therapy.

    This paper describes the therapy process for eighty women and outcomes for twenty-three women who had experienced domestic violence and were engaged in narrative therapy, utilising the Partners for Change Outcome Management System (PCOMS). PCOMS consists of integrating two outcome rating scales into each counselling session – the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) and the Session Rating Scale (SRS). The design of the research was clinical data mining.

    This paper briefly discusses difficulties and limitations of the concept of evidence-based practice when applied to narrative therapy. The study identifies and defines several different patterns of therapy outcomes. PCOMS was used to demonstrate that clients who were treated for at least six, one-hour sessions of narrative therapy for complex trauma (domestic violence), showed positive outcomes equivalent to other studies using different treatments.

  • Healing, Politics and Community Action— Nacho Maldonaldo

    $5.50

    This paper traces some of the histories that have shaped the author’s understandings of the role of psychiatry and family therapy, and discusses some of the key current issues in the field, most notably domestic violence. This paper was originally delivered as a keynote address in Oaxaca, Mexico, at the 6th International Narrative Therapy and Community Work Conference.

  • Group Work with Women Who Have Experienced Violence— Jacqui Morse & Alice Morgan

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    In working with women who have experienced violence in heterosexual relationships, groups provide the opportunity for linking lives around shared themes, values and commitments. The work described in this paper utilises narrative practices to highlight the context of women’s lives, to centre women’s knowledge, to locate responsibility, to accentuate alternative and preferred descriptions of identity, and to build connections between women. Specific attention is also paid to deconstruct dominant gender discourses.

  • Talking with Men Who Have Used Violence in Intimate Relationships: An interview with Tod Augusta-Scott

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    Tod Augusta-Scott works with men who have used violence in their intimate relationships. This interview considers a number of key themes in this work, including ways of inviting men to consider the effects of their violence; ways of exploring expressions of shame and remorse; the importance of developing alternative story-lines of respect and responsibility; approaches to group work; and the use of documentation. The interview also provides Tod with the opportunity to reflect upon his own work practices and performance of masculinity. The interviewer was David Denborough.

  • Considering Issues of Domestic Violence and Abuse in Palliative Care and Bereavement Situations— Judy Wright

    $0.00

    Through relaying the stories of older women, this short paper invites readers to consider the importance of listening for and responding to experiences of domestic violence and abuse in palliative care settings. Whether older women are themselves nearing their deaths, or they are caring for male partners who are in the process of dying, issues of violence and abuse are often present and require careful response.

  • Letter writing in two contexts: Facilitating stories of resistance— Renee Butler

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    This article explores some of the ways in which narrative therapy letter writing can assist in facilitating double-storied testimonies for women in two work contexts, family support work and crisis response. It briefly introduces the reader to some of the women and children who have been involved in this therapeutic letter-writing process and gives the reader a glimpse into some of the narrative letters that have been exchanged. It discusses how letters can richly acknowledge women’s skills and knowledges, especially when working in an environment with strict time pressures, and discusses some of the ways that narrative letters can be incorporated into a busy work environment..

  • Journeys of Freedoms: Responding to the Effects of Domestic Violence— Kath Muller

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    This paper outlines a community training project which sought to walk alongside women on their journeys to reclaim their lives from the effects of domestic violence. The community training project enabled connections between women, provided a context for externalising and re-authoring conversations, and allowed women to bear witness to each others’ stories of resistance and survival in the face of violence and abuse. A journey metaphor was used throughout the ten weekly gatherings of women. Following the project, having named shared concerns, the women went on to explore shared social action.

  • Seeking safety and acknowledgement: women who have experienced domestic violence— WOWSafe

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    This piece was created from an interview (conducted by Dulwich Centre Publications’ staff writer, David Denborough) with WOWSafe – Women of the West for Safe Families, which is an organisation of women in Adelaide, South Australia, who have personally survived men’s violence in the home and now campaign in order to prevent it in the lives of others.

1,959 Comments

  1. Thank you for this overview of Narrative Therapy. I am returning to practice after some time away, and these reminders are timely and appreciated.

  2. Hi Chris

    I really enjoyed watching your video about Narrative Walks. My project is based in Blaenau Gwent, in South Wales, Uk. I’m wondering whether I might use such an approach in my work with our Youth Service, who support young people between the ages of 11 and 25. Have you any thoughts on this? Are there any resources available, either free or to purchase?

    Best wishes

    Paul

    • Hi Paul, m

      Much of my early attempts of the program were with the 15-20 year old age bracket and I found it worked really well. When I recently had an opportunity to run the program again with this age bracket – I extended the finish time so that could spend more time at the stop points and have a fire at the last resting place to talk about our intentions after the walk. This meant that we used head torches for the 2km which added a bit of a sense of theatre to the day. It was pretty cool.

      If you email me on hello@embarkpsych.com I can send you the manual. Or ask any other questions via this page so others might share in the answers.

      CD

  3. Thank you for sharing your insights. This has been very enlightening as a student studying post-grad social work. Recently my tutorial group was discussing how professionals often use their interpretation and that clients may not get to see how some professionals interpret their stories, in this way many things can be missed especially what the client sees as being important.

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