narrative therapy

Posted by on Dec 20, 2016 in | 0 comments

Showing 145–160 of 190 results

  • The Power of Healing in the Yarns: Working with Aboriginal Men— Larry Maxwell Towney

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    ‘The power of healing in yarn’ is an approach to conversations with Indigenous Australian men that involves the use of certain narrative practices in culturally appropriate ways. This paper, by Larry Towney, was initially delivered as a part of a keynote session at Dulwich Centre’s 2nd International Summer School of Narrative Practice, in Adelaide in November 2004.

  • University Students Take Action Under the Gaze of ‘the Eye of Success’: A Narrative Collective Initiative— Marcela Polanco

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    This paper presents an initiative for narrative collective work to address western ideas of success. Within the context of the author’s practice at the Student Counseling Center at Nova Southeastern University, Florida, this initiative addresses what the author calls ‘the eye of success’, along with its effects on students’ identity conclusions. Drawing from ideas about modern power, the author situates the eye of success in western educational traditions that set thresholds of success and rating scales against which students measure their lives. The collective narrative practice employed to respond to this, ‘The Wall of Wisdom’, is presented as a way to extend individualistic therapeutic practices by creating public spaces of acknowledgement that link students’ practical options for action.

  • Using Narrative Therapy to Respond to Addiction: An Experience of Practice in Pakistan— Muhammad Mussaffa Butt

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    This paper is based on narrative work carried out in an addiction treatment centre in Pakistan, with someone who had struggled with drugs for a long time. The use of narrative therapy not only helped the client immensely, but also changed my way of thinking and my orientation as a psychologist. Narrative therapy was not emphasised in our course work on clinical psychology. And during our professional training in the addiction treatment centre, it was not even mentioned. However, the first time I used narrative therapy, I became fascinated by the process and its outcomes. The progress of the following sessions further strengthened this belief in the therapy and we continued with it. In this way, both of us (the client and the therapist) developed preferred stories by which to live and work.

  • Weaving networks of hope with families, practitioners and communities: Inspirations from systemic and narrative approaches— Glenda Fredman

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    Over the last decade, inspired by systemic family therapy and narrative approaches, Glenda and her teams in the UK have found ways to bring families, practitioners and communities together to respond to medical, mental health and social care crises. This work has taken place with children, adolescents, older people and people affected by intellectual disability and their families. This paper shares an inspiring story of this work and describes ways of ‘conducting’ and ‘weaving’ networks of hope.

  • What’s in a game? Narrative therapy approaches with people who have relationships with gaming and online communities— Dale Andersen-Giberson

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    This article outlines various approaches in working with people who have relationships with gaming and online communities, and includes transcripts to share the co-learning that unfolded in narrative conversations. Discoveries include the helpfulness of using narrative therapy to enlist positioning around gaming and the vast possibilities that exist for unpacking the significance of online communities as arenas for preferred identity construction.

  • A Mexican perspective on teaching narrative ideas— Emily Sued & Barbara Amunategui

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    Emily and Barbara are well-respected therapists and teachers within the Instituto Latinoamericano de Estudios de la Familia (ILEF) in Mexico City. In this short piece, derived from a lively and enjoyable interview which took place in Mexico City, Emily and Barbara speak about the ways in which narrative and social constructionist ideas, and the local Mexican context, shape their teaching.

  • A Narrative Theatre Approach to Working with Communities Affected by Trauma, Conflict & War— Yvonne Sliep

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    This paper describes a narrative theatre approach to working with communities affected by trauma, conflict and war. The approach was initially tried in villages within rural Malawi in relation to issues of HIV/AIDS. It has been developed further over the last ten years in different parts of the world and is currently being engaged with in Uganda, Burundi and East Congo. This paper explores the effects of trauma on community life and grassroots, theatrical means of responding. This approach has been influenced by the ideas and practices of Narrative Therapy and Forum Theatre.

  • Building bridges: Re-authoring workplace relationships— Ninetta Tavano

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    This article reflects on the journey of many therapists to find ways of sustaining collegial relationships across differing paradigms. The author offers three stories of consultation with therapists about workplace difficulties to demonstrate the use of a number of narrative approaches. These include externalising conversations, richly describing intentional state understandings, and re-membering practices.

  • Ethical Curiosity and Poststructuralism— Katy Batha

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    In this paper, the author explore the idea of ethical curiosity in therapeutic inquiry and the ways in which poststructuralist theories supports her work as a school counsellor. The paper also poses some questions to reflect upon whilst aiming to perform ethical curiosity.

  • Externalising Questions: A Micro-analytic Look at Their Use in Narrative Therapy— Tom Strong

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    This paper examines the narrative therapy practice of asking and answering externalisation questions. It looks at some of theoretical and clinical literature related to the use of these questions and then turns a micro-dynamic look at some examples of how such questions were asked and answered in the course of therapeutic dialogue. The focus is on learning from these analyses to enhance therapists’ ability to engage clients in collaborative and resourceful externalising conversations.

  • First steps towards an alternative suicide risk screening tool: Navigating risk assessment and encouraging life-sustaining conversations— Carly Forster and Rina Taub

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    This paper explores preferred ways of working in relation to suicide screening in situations where this is a requirement of professional practice. We describe our concerns about how approaches to ‘suicide risk assessment’ were affecting our work and the young people we were required to assess. We came to see the assessment process as an intervention of itself, with the potential for negative consequences for young people, workers and the therapeutic relationship. In response, we drew on a narrative and post-structuralist framework to develop an alternative set of assessment questions. Our questionnaire is intended to scaffold conversations that externalise the problem, elicit people’s life-sustaining practices, and enable assessment of distress and suicidal thoughts. The questionnaire has so far been trialled by a young person and psychologist in Sydney, and an adult and mental health worker in Singapore. We present our findings about these insiders’ experiences of the questionnaire. We hope this article will invite readers to connect to curiosity about ways of having conversations that open up space for people to speak of despair, and questions about living, in ways that are respectful and encouraging of life-sustaining steps.

  • Is This Sex Addiction?: Questioning ‘Sex Addiction’ in Therapeutic Counselling Conversations— Ash Rehn

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    This paper examines the concept of ‘sex addiction’, and its increasing popularity since the emergence of AIDS in gay communities in the 1980s. Adopting narrative therapy’s ethical orientations of decentred yet influential positioning, and being in a ‘lifelong apprenticeship’, the author worked with a number of men to renegotiate their relationship with ‘sex addiction’ in their lives. This work included various maps of narrative practice, including the Statement of Position Map / externalising conversations, re-membering conversations, the absent but implicit, and deconstructive conversations.

  • Language Justice: Narrative therapy on the fringes of Colombian magical realism— marcela polanco

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    When problems can talk, dead people can speak, hope can taste, and heart, soul and mind can dance together, a new discursive space is brought to life in therapeutic conversations. In this paper I discuss the reimagination of narrative therapy into my Colombian culture, adopting magical realism as a literary means to engage the imagination in therapeutic conversations. I transgress mainstream rational epistemological traditions of evidence to situate narrative therapy practice on the fringes of convention. I bring to the forefront the ordinary weirdness of narrative therapy conversations via the magical realism’s absurdity and creativity. I stage the discussion in Gabriel García Márquez’s Macondo in his novels to speak the unspeakable, to locate the unlocatable, to touch the untouchable, to hear the inaudible, and to utter the ineffable in our lives.

  • Living like playing: Working with online gamers from a narrative therapy perspective — Mehmet Dinc

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    Many young people and their parents experience ongoing conflict about online gaming. These conflicts can lead to shame, distance and decreased self-esteem for young people. This paper explores the use of co-research, re-authoring, therapeutic documents and other narrative practices for working with young people experiencing issues with and conflict about online gaming.

  • Naming problems as political action— Ron Findlay

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    There is no ‘Political Practices in Therapy Hall of Fame’ but it can be fun to imagine one. If so, which narrative therapy practices might we propose for membership and why? This piece explores a few of the author’s favourite candidates which relate to naming problems in externalising conversations. This piece also emphasises how ‘therapeutic’ narrative practices are ‘political practices’.

  • Narrative and Open Dialogue: Strangers in the night or easy bedfellows?— Val Jackson and Hugh Fox

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    This paper briefly describes narrative and open dialogue approaches before exploring their shared values, ways of working, their differences and the possibilities for integration. Both authors have extensive experience in using a narrative therapy approach, while Val Jackson, a family and systemic psychotherapist, also uses an open dialogue approach in her work in an early intervention in psychosis service in Yorkshire, UK.

1,959 Comments

  1. Thank you for this overview of Narrative Therapy. I am returning to practice after some time away, and these reminders are timely and appreciated.

  2. Hi Chris

    I really enjoyed watching your video about Narrative Walks. My project is based in Blaenau Gwent, in South Wales, Uk. I’m wondering whether I might use such an approach in my work with our Youth Service, who support young people between the ages of 11 and 25. Have you any thoughts on this? Are there any resources available, either free or to purchase?

    Best wishes

    Paul

    • Hi Paul, m

      Much of my early attempts of the program were with the 15-20 year old age bracket and I found it worked really well. When I recently had an opportunity to run the program again with this age bracket – I extended the finish time so that could spend more time at the stop points and have a fire at the last resting place to talk about our intentions after the walk. This meant that we used head torches for the 2km which added a bit of a sense of theatre to the day. It was pretty cool.

      If you email me on hello@embarkpsych.com I can send you the manual. Or ask any other questions via this page so others might share in the answers.

      CD

  3. Thank you for sharing your insights. This has been very enlightening as a student studying post-grad social work. Recently my tutorial group was discussing how professionals often use their interpretation and that clients may not get to see how some professionals interpret their stories, in this way many things can be missed especially what the client sees as being important.

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