re-membering conversations

Posted by on Sep 22, 2016 in | 0 comments

Showing 1–16 of 19 results

  • Discovering Children’s Responses to Trauma: A Response-based Narrative Practice— Angel Yuen

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    Modern discourses of victimhood, which are often present in instances of childhood trauma, can contribute considerably to establishing long-term negative identity conclusions. However, focussing on children’s responses to trauma can aid in conversations that contribute to rich second story development, without re-traumatising children or young people. These kinds of enquiry can focus on children’s acts of resistance, places of safety, and other skills of living. This paper gives examples of therapy informed by this approach, and provides a map of four levels of enquiry for conversations with children and young people which elicit and build upon responses to trauma.

  • My Practice as Described by Those Who Consult Me— Marit E. Løkken

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    Clients’ experiences of conversations with therapists is a crucial issue, but one that is often not directly researched. Marit Løkken embarked on a research project that involved not only asking her clients about their experiences of therapy, but also involved developing the research project, and the questions asked, in consultation with those clients. This article describes this process, includes examples of some of the responses, and includes an interview structured as a definitional ceremony to record her reflections on these responses.

  • Overeating as a Serious Problem and Foods as Real Good Friends: Revising the Relationship with Food and Self in Narrative Conversations— Angela Tsun on-Kee

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    This paper tells the story of ‘John’ and the ways in which he has revised his relationship with food and with himself through narrative conversations. It is the first example within narrative therapy literature that documents an approach to working with overeating. The work took place in Hong Kong, China.

  • Stories of the body: Incorporating the body into narrative practice— Eleni E. Karageorgiou

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    This paper is an attempt to incorporate the body into the practice of narrative therapy so as to offer richer possibilities for therapists to work with clients’ stories. The paper presents various case studies working with various body ‘issues’, such as quadriplegia, multiple sclerosis, sexual intercourse, stress, and body image. Maps of narrative practice brought to these issues include externalising conversations, outsider-witness conversations, re-membering conversations, and addressing personal failure.

  • The ‘Life Certificate’: A tool for grief work in Singapore— Mohamed Fareez

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    This article proposes an alternative to the formal, impersonal document of the death certificate – a ‘Life Certificate’, a narrative therapeutic document to honour the lives of lost loved ones. The article shows examples of the ‘Life Certificate’ used in practice, as well as a six-stage map of narrative practice that can be used in conjunction with it, to help renegotiate people’s relationships with grief.

  • A Time to Talk: Re-membering Conversations with Elders— Bobbi Rood

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    This paper describes using various narrative practices with elderly residents in a community care home. The author first reviews some of the historical influences of work with elderly people on narrative therapy, particularly the legacy of Barbara Myerhoff’s work on life histories and performance. Following this are different examples of outcomes of engaging in narrative conversations with elderly people including a collective document, poetry, and excerpts from re-membering conversations.

  • Joe’s voyage of life map: away from alcohol— Nick Coleman

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    This article explores using a visual therapeutic document, the Voyage of Life map, with men living in Aotearoa/New Zealand. These men, who are revising their relationships with alcohol and other influences on their lives, have had previous experience with twelve-step models and broader ‘recovery’ approaches. 

    The Voyage of Life map, and the broader narrative practices that surround its use, are demonstrated through the story of one man, Joe, who is of a mixed cultural background. Through the process, Joe renegotiates his life in relation to alcohol, and re-claims aspects of his Māori whakapapaʼ(history/genealogy).

  • Consulting young people about living with cancer— Carolyn Ng

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    This article draws on the narrative therapy concept of ‘consulting your consultants’, and documents the skills and knowledges of young people who are living with cancer. The young people offer their ideas about how to think about aspects of cancer in externalised ways; ways of focusing on living, rather than dying; the life lessons and skills they have learnt from family members; and how their skills and knowledges might be helpful for others.

  • Creating an Alternative Pathway through the Criminal Justice System: Enabling Alternative Stories to Be Heard— Kate Hannan

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    This article describes the work of the Australian-based Court Support Program, which offers support to young people who have been charged with committing a crime, or have been a victim of crime. The program helps young people understand the criminal justice system during the three stages of presentencing, sentencing, and post-sentencing. To describe the program’s work in detail, the author presents her work with one young man using a range of narrative practices during each of these three stages.

  • Narrative Approaches in Centrelink: ‘It’s Those Turning Questions …’— Lesley Dalyell

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    This paper documents a narratively-based interview guide for social work assessments used in Centrelink, a major Australian government department. The questions used in the assessment are illustrated by examples from conversations with the young people and their parents consulting the service, as well as reflections from the team of social workers who trialled the interview guide. The paper shows how working within existing governmental frameworks can still lead to conversations with clients that are respectful, generative, and hopeful.

  • Re-membering Reciprocal Relationships— Chris Dolman

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    Re-membering conversations are one of the key maps of narrative therapy practice. This article explores some interrelationships between re-membering conversations and the principles of Just Therapy, along with the other narrative practices of ‘the absent but implicit’ and regarding distress as testimony, enquiring about personal agency, and naming injustice. This interweaving of theory and practice is shown through work with Aboriginal people in Murray Bridge, a rural town in South Australia.

    Free article

    Bringing Lost Loved Ones into Our Conversations: Talking About Loss in Honouring Ways (a reflection on Chris Dolman’s Re-membering Reciprocal Relationships) by Barbara Wingard

  • Remembering Joan: Re-membering Practices as Eulogies and Memorials— Mark Trudinger

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    The article discusses the re-membering practices of collective practices such as eulogies. The document is a collection of stories from some of the staff and residents at Grafton Aged Care Home about Joan, one of the first residents of the home.

  • Leaving a legacy’ and ‘Letting the legacy live’: Using narrative practices while working with children and their families in a child palliative care program— Linda Moxley-Haegert

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    This article provides an overview of narrative practices used with children who are dying and their families in a hospital palliative care setting. Narrative practices of subordinate storyline development, remembering conversations and definitional ceremony, living documents, and collective narrative practice, are used to allow children to ‘leave a legacy’, and for parents to ‘let the legacy live’. This piece also includes reflections on working in bilingual contexts, as well as some ethical considerations of working with children in oncology settings.

  • Narrative Foundations and Social Justice— Bharati Acharya

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    Narrative practice has a long interest in issues of social justice. This paper explores some of the relationships of these two realms, and asks ‘What are the ways in which narrative foundations and practice can support those who work tirelessly for social change?’ The author reports on a project of interviewing activists in various social justice contexts using narrative conversations to explore and support what sustains them.

  • Dancing Our Own Steps: A Queer Families’ Project— Kath Reid

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    This paper focuses on the key narrative practices that informed the Queer Families project, which sought to co-explore and richly-describe diverse meanings of ‘family’, and ways of ‘living’ family. The project explored the history of the skills, practices, hopes, and dreams that family members brought to their versions of ‘family’, and drew on the metaphor of ‘family as a verb’, to explore alternatives ways of doing ‘families of choice’. The article first contextualises the concept of family, deconstructing dominant ‘family’ narratives in western cultures, and historicising the notion of ‘nuclear family’. It then describes the key narrative practices that informed the project, including re-authoring and re-membering conversations, therapeutic letter-writing, and documenting shared community themes. The article then describes the collective narrative practice of sharing these themes with other people to generate ‘re-tellings’ that were then shared with the initial families in the project.

  • Letter Writing: Possibilities and Practice— Susan Stevens

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    This article revisits the use of therapeutic letter writing in narrative therapy contexts. The purposes, types, and content of letters are explored, with examples given of various letters written in different therapeutic contexts. The article discusses how letters can support the various maps of narrative practice, as well as workplace and professional development considerations, such as time pressures and funding considerations, as well as how letterwriting can support learning various aspects of narrative practice.

1,959 Comments

  1. Thank you for this overview of Narrative Therapy. I am returning to practice after some time away, and these reminders are timely and appreciated.

  2. Hi Chris

    I really enjoyed watching your video about Narrative Walks. My project is based in Blaenau Gwent, in South Wales, Uk. I’m wondering whether I might use such an approach in my work with our Youth Service, who support young people between the ages of 11 and 25. Have you any thoughts on this? Are there any resources available, either free or to purchase?

    Best wishes

    Paul

    • Hi Paul, m

      Much of my early attempts of the program were with the 15-20 year old age bracket and I found it worked really well. When I recently had an opportunity to run the program again with this age bracket – I extended the finish time so that could spend more time at the stop points and have a fire at the last resting place to talk about our intentions after the walk. This meant that we used head torches for the 2km which added a bit of a sense of theatre to the day. It was pretty cool.

      If you email me on hello@embarkpsych.com I can send you the manual. Or ask any other questions via this page so others might share in the answers.

      CD

  3. Thank you for sharing your insights. This has been very enlightening as a student studying post-grad social work. Recently my tutorial group was discussing how professionals often use their interpretation and that clients may not get to see how some professionals interpret their stories, in this way many things can be missed especially what the client sees as being important.

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