How we deal with Autistic burnout by KJ Wiseheart

KJ Wiseheart is a multiply neurodivergent counsellor and narrative practitioner. They are committed to co-creating neurocosmopolitan conversations and communities where all neurocognitive differences in experience, communication and embodiment are appreciated and affirmed. KJ is also enthusiastically exploring therapeutic applications of tabletop role playing games. KJ is a graduate of the Master of Narrative Therapy and Community Work program at The University of Melbourne. KJ can be contacted care of Dulwich Centre.

In this video, KJ introduces the accompanying collective document “How we deal with Autistic burnout: A living document created by Autistic adults for Autistic adults”. This document was created through a series of interviews with lived experience experts who generously shared their skills and hard-won knowledges. KJ describes the process of creating this document, and how they endeavoured to adapt and localise existing practices of collective documentation, for accessibility and cultural resonance with Autistic community values and ways of being.

Key words: Autism; burnout; lived experience; collective document; narrative practice


Wiseheart, K. J. (2024). How we deal with Autistic burnout: A living document created by Autistic adults for Autistic adults [Video file]. International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, (1), https://doi.org/10.0000toCome

Author pronouns: they/them


Video notes

The collective document described in the video can be downloaded here.

 

References

Denborough, D. (2008). Collective narrative practice: Responding to individuals, groups, and communities who have experienced trauma. Dulwich Centre Publications.

Epston, D. (1999). Co-research: The making of an alternative knowledge. In Dulwich Centre (Ed.), Narrative therapy and community work: A conference collection. Dulwich Centre Publications.

Higgins, J. M., Arnold, S. R. C., Weise, J., Pellicano, E., & Trollor, J. N. (2021). Defining autistic burnout through experts by lived experience: Grounded Delphi method investigating #AutisticBurnout. Autism, 25(8), 2356–2369. https://doi.org/10.1177/13623613211019858

Human, E. (2018). Emerging from burnout. In E. Bartmess (Ed.), Knowing why: Adult-diagnosed Autistic people on life and Autism (pp. 16–25). Autistic Press

Lawson, Wenn. (2020). Adaptive morphing and coping with social threat in Autism: An Autistic perspective. Journal of Intellectual Disability – Diagnosis and Treatment, 8, 519–526. https://doi.org/10.6000/2292-2598.2020.08.03.29

Newman, D. (2008). “Rescuing the said from the saying of It”: Living documentation in narrative therapy. International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, (3), 24–34.

Newman, D. (2016). How we deal with “way out thoughts”: A living document ways of talking with young people about suicidal thoughts. International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, (4), 59–66.

Olinger, C. (2010). Privileging Insider-knowledges in the World of Autism. International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, (2), 37–50.

Rozema, R., & Bass, C. (2019). Note from the editors: This moment of Arrival. Ought: The Journal of Autistic Culture, 1(1), 4–5. https://doi.org/10.9707/2833-1508.1016

Sostar, T. (2019). Non-binary Superpowers! A collaborative conversation between non-binary youth in Adelaide, South Australia, and non-binary youth in Calgary, Alberta. International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, (2), 24–35.

Straus, J. N. (2013). Autism as culture. In L. J. Davis (Ed.). The disability studies reader (pp. 460–485). Routledge.

Tse, K. H. (2016). Collective narrative practice with young people with Aspergers syndrome who have experienced bullying. International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, 3, 8–20. https://doi.org/10.3316/informit.460139669446846

Van der Klift, E. (2019). A reflection on self-regulation and neuro-conceal. International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, (3), 68–72.

Leave a Reply