Caring for trans community – Tiffany Sostar

Tiffany Sostar (they/them) is a bisexual, nonbinary, neurodivergent, disabled narrative practitioner and community worker. They love collective narrative practice and documentation, making zines, reading speculative fiction and being in community. They live as a white settler in Treaty 7 territory in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. This is the home of the Blackfoot Confederacy, including the Siksika, Kainai, and Piikani First Nations; the Tsuut’ina; and the Iyarhe Nakoda, including the Chiniki, Bearspaw, and Goodstoney First Nations. This is also the home of the Métis Nation of Alberta. Tiffany is about to begin a PhD program researching narrative practices in support of trans lives.

This audio practice note and the collective document it describes are part of “narrative projects in support of trans lives”, a collection of work being undertaken by Tiffany Sostar, Elliot Trimble, and Nathan Viktor Fawaz. This practice note and collective document are the first to be published in this collection of work. Not to fix anything, but just to offer a millimetre of relief or breath or humour or companionship: A collective document about caring for trans community brings together many stories of care within and with trans community. Our hope is that this document will help connect readers to a sense of community and collective action, and will invite readers, regardless of gender identity, to join us in taking actions of care within a social context that is increasingly hostile to trans lives. These stories, reflection questions, and invitations describe and welcome a wide range of care, including small, personal, and beautifully imperfect actions taken by and alongside trans community.

Key words: community work; collective document; trans; gender identity; suicide; care; narrative practice


Sostar, T. (2024). Care for trans lives [Audio recording]. International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, (1), https://doi.org/10.4320/VYKP6507

Author pronouns: they/them


Note

The collective document described in the video can be downloaded here.

 

References

Denborough, D. (2014). Retelling the stories of our lives: Everyday narrative therapy to draw inspiration and transform experience. Norton.

Dulwich Centre. (2017). How we are trying to avoid misgendering others. https://dulwichcentre.com.au/misgendering/

Hedtke, L., & Winslate, J. (2017). The crafting of grief: Constructing aesthetic responses to loss. Routledge.

White, M. (2003). Narrative practice and community assignments. International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, (2). 17–55.

Wingard, B., & Lester, J. (2001). Telling our stories in ways that make us stronger. Dulwich Centre Publications.

This Post Has 2 Comments

  1. Carla Bruce-Lee

    Thank you Tiffany!

  2. David Newman

    Dear Tiffany,
    There was so much that moved me with your collective document. I loved much about it:
    When considering the responses to the question ‘why are we here?’ I was startled and relieved by Nathan’s answer, ‘keeping death at the centre’. This is a purpose for our life and work that I have not heard articulated in such a way before and I will return to this beautiful description when considering why I do my life and my work and it will sustain me.
    I was teary when I read the ‘validate Elliot jar’ story.
    For me, practicing the skill of inclusive and sensitive language was a wonderful suggestion for my life and work.
    I respected the great thoughtfulness with the resisting harm questions at the end of the document and will consider ways to use such questions in my work and teaching.
    With appreciation and respect,
    David Newman

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