2004

Posted by on Dec 21, 2016 in | 0 comments

Showing 1–16 of 40 results

  • Flags and Multiple Identities: Being Chinese in Hong Kong— Ho Chi-kwan

    $5.50

    Through an exploration of personal history and narrative, this piece conveys some of the complex themes that contribute to the construction of Chinese Hong Kong identity. Poignant imagery invites readers to consider the question: ‘What does it mean to be Chinese in Hong Kong?’

  • The Narratives of Love: Addressing the Issue of Love in a Therapeutic Context— Elena Smith

    $9.90

    This paper explores the effect of addressing the issue of love in a therapeutic context. I have no intention of drawing any conclusions about the phenomena of love as such, but I intend to describe what happened when I purposely chose to address the question of love in therapeutic conversations. I was curious to explore these questions: What are people’s stories of love? What are the practices of love in people’s lives? What are the meanings they ascribe to love? And how does a person’s concept of love shape their thoughts and actions?

  • The Questions Posed by Our Work with Women Who Have Experienced Sexual Abuse— Sue Mann

    $9.90

    This paper is one in a series by Sue Mann focusing on some of the most complex and challenging questions that arise in work with women who have experienced sexual abuse as children. In this paper the author describes the principles which shape her approach in this work, as well as responses to questions about sex work and sexual identity that have arisen in her conversations with women. This paper was delivered as a keynote at the second International Summer School of Narrative Practice in November 2004.

  • Town Bikes Unite— Linette Harriott

    $5.50

    Written by a counsellor in an Australian Centre Against Sexual Assault, this paper questions the attitudes of the dominant culture to women who are sexually prolific. It also explores the links for some women between experiences of sexual assault and subsequent prolific sexual activity. By questioning the effects of dominant attitudes towards women’s sexuality and by inviting therapists and researchers to explore the meanings that women give to their own experiences of sexuality, this paper offers new challenges to the counselling field.

  • Climbing the Mountain: The Experience of Parents Whose Children Are in Care

    $9.90

    The experience of parents whose children have been removed from their families by child protection services is a realm that is rarely considered. This paper describes the inspiring work of a Parenting/Playgroup for parents whose children are in care. The principles which inform this group are described and the experiences of the parents themselves are conveyed. This paper was created from a series of interviews.

  • Deconstructing Love in the Context of Sexual Abuse— Sue Mann

    $0.00

    This reflection explores the complex realm of the experiences of women who were subjected to sexual abuse as children. Many of the circumstances of childhood sexual abuse can contribute to considerable confusion about understandings and experiences of love, as abuse often occurs in contexts which are described as loving. In some circumstances the person who has abused has, on occasions, also been loving to the child. This short piece offers some reflections on options for therapists in responding to women in these circumstances.

  • Narrative Maps of Practice: Proposals for the Deconstructing Addiction League— Anthony C.

    $9.90

    This paper invites therapists to consider establishing community resources informed by narrative practices as a way of challenging the culture of consumption and assisting those trying to revise their use of substances. The paper also discusses a range of specific proposals as to how various narrative maps of practice can be used to deconstruct addiction. This paper was given as a keynote address at Dulwich Centre’s inaugural Summer School of Narrative Practice, in Adelaide, South Australia, in November 2003. It was heralded by those present as both a call to action and a creative engagement with narrative ideas. The presentation has been adapted slightly for publication here.

  • Reconstructing Life Journeys: Group Work with Young Women Who Experience Mental Illness— Little Lit Siu-wai

    $9.90

    This article describes creative work with a group of young women who have been suffering from mental illness for several years. The work conveyed here builds upon the metaphor of a journey of life (see McPhie & Chaffey 1998) and adapts this to a Hong Kong context.

  • A Letter to the Feminism Project— co-ordinated by Shona Russell, Maggie Carey & Cheryl White

    $0.00

    The paper, ‘Feminism, therapy and narrative ideas – Exploring some not so commonly asked questions’, compiled by Shona Russell and Maggie Carey, was published in an earlier edition of the International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work (2003 #2) and heralded the beginning of an ongoing project on this theme. Subsequent articles by Judy Wright (2003): ‘Considering issues of domestic violence and abuse in palliative care and bereavement settings’; and ‘The Mother-Daughter Project: cocreating pro-girl, pro-mother culture through adolescence and beyond’ by SuEllen Hamkins, Renee Schultz et al. (2003), represent ongoing explorations of these issues.

    If you were not a subscriber to the International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work in 2003 it is possible to receive back issues (just contact your local distributer). A number of these feminist-informed papers are also available on the Dulwich Centre website: www.dulwichcentre.com.au

  • Different Understandings of Love— Angela Tsun On-kee

    $0.00

    What is love? People’s understandings of love and their attempts to find and create it, significantly influence how they live their lives. This short reflection suggests that examining and deconstructing philosophies of love can open up meaningful realms for therapeutic explorations.

  • Hong Kong – The Place That Shapes My Identity— Little Lit Siu-wai

    $0.00

    Through an exploration of family history this piece invites the reader to consider the complexities of identity faced by the people of Hong Kong.

  • Creating a Counselling Flyer: A Collective Approach

    $0.00

    How can flyers and brochures for narrative therapy counselling services be created in ways that are congruent with narrative ideas? A range of practitioners from different parts of the world contributed to create the wording for such a flyer in the hope that this will spark ideas and further conversations.

  • Overcoming Craving: The Use of Narrative Practices in Breaking Drug Habits— Har Man-kwong

    $9.90

    This paper describes the use of narrative practices in working with young people who wish to revise their relationship with substance use. It describes the use of the metaphor of the migration of identity and externalising conversations, and explores issues related to Hong Kong culture.

  • Stories from Robben Island: A Report from a Journey of Healing— David Denborough

    $9.90

    A three-day gathering on Robben Island, South Africa, organised by the Institute for the Healing of Memories and the Desmond Tutu Peace Centre, brought participants together from many different parts of the world to share stories and ideas about the healing of memories and ways to address histories of trauma. This paper describes some of the principles and practices of healing which shaped this meeting. It describes the structure of story-telling and reflection that occurred, and includes a number of stories, reflections and the lyrics of songs to convey the experience.

  • Transforming Tragedy: Making New Family— Jeannette Samper

    $0.00

    Sometimes, after family tragedies, children show the way forward. In this short reflection, a Colombian therapist describes just such a circumstance.

  • Honouring Many Relations of Love: Perspectives on Tasmania’s ‘Relationship Act’— compiled by Paul Levett

    $5.50

    Due to decades of work by gay and lesbian people, in different parts of the world there is currently much debate about ways of acknowledging lesbian and gay relationships in similar ways to how heterosexual marriage is honoured. In Australia, just as the Federal Government is legislating to ensure that same-sex marriage cannot occur, the State Government of Tasmania has developed a novel approach to acknowledging relationships. This paper explains this approach and also contains a number of speeches given by members of lesbian and gay families in support of the Tasmanian legislation.

2,021 Comments

  1. Thank you to Tileah for a wonderful presentation. I love hearing the word “yarn” used in this powerful way (Americans also have that term). The practice of “translating”, of shifting concepts into language that can be more usefully heard, is very powerful. As coaches we can make good use of this to help clients uncover their hidden or forgotten resources.

  2. These stories are amazing examples of what we can discover when we hold onto our “beginner’s mind” and remember that the other person (client, patient) has the information and understanding, not us. We talk a lot in leadership development about “co-creating” and I think this is a beautiful example of two very complementary roles: the person who has the story and the person who helps to explore and shape it.

  3. I like the idea of narrative – there is something about giving people the power to create a narrative, rather than simply appearing in a story told by someone else. Within the narrative metaphor, I especially enjoy the fabric metaphor – the idea of strands. These may touch each other, or not, may go well together in tone or color, or not. But again, there is some power in creating and weaving the narrative.
    In my own work with coaching and leadership development, I find that the emphasis on narrative(s) helps make things more tangible, and therefore brings them to their true scale, instead of letting them take on imaginary and unclearly described proportions.

  4. I love this. Telling our stories in ways that make us stronger. Such a powerful sentiment. Sometimes through trauma, it is hard to access the words that really encapsulate that experience – though using the written word does help us access those hard to utter parts of our memories … in those cases though perhaps the story we tell ourselves is not one that makes us feel strong in the first instance – so finding a way to tell that story in a way that focuses on the strength of surviving to tell that story is just amazing!

1