These weekly Meet the Author zoom meetings with narrative practice authors brought people together during 2020 from different parts of the world. This meant a great deal to us during the pandemic. As the pandemic continues, so too do these Meet the Author events! We are now looking forward to the 2021 season! These are being hosted by Dulwich Centre Foundation, the University of Melbourne and Evanston Family Therapy Center (USA).

Upcoming meetings:

9:30am (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Jill Freedman will be offering reflections.

David Nylund has worked in a broad array of settings including community mental health, non-profit agencies, managed care, and private practice. David specializes in working with people struggling with anxiety and depression; LGBTQ identities; couples therapy; trauma and abuse; life transitions (grief and loss, divorce, career changes, etc.); children and teens struggling against problems; ADHD; youth and adults with eating/food related issues; substance abuse problems; parenting difficulties; and family therapy. David has a particular interest and specialty in working with transgender and gender non-conforming youth and their families. David is the Clinical Director of the Gender Health Center, a non-profit agency in Sacramento that serves transgender and LGBQ communities.

Please read the paper The economics of narrative: How many sessions is a letter worth? and then bring your questions for David!

The meeting will take place for one hour at the following times:
Adelaide – Tuesday 28 September, at 9:30 am
Singapore – Tuesday 28 September, at 8:00 am
Beijing – Tuesday 28 September, at 8:00 am
Hong Kong – Tuesday 28 September, 8:00 am
Auckland – Tuesday 28 September, at 12:00 pm
Vancouver – Monday 27 September, at 5:00 pm
Los Angeles – Monday 27 September, at 5:00 pm
Chicago – Monday 27 September, at 7:00 pm
Atlanta – Monday 27 September, at 8:00 pm
Toronto – Monday 27 September, at 8:00 pm
Santiago – Monday 27 September, at 8:00 pm
Rio de Janeiro – Monday 27 September, at 9:00 pm

Register in advance for this meeting: https://unimelb.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMuce2vqTgrE9FlEBdepshGCldLffo4WwxR

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

These events are organised by Dulwich Centre, Evanston Family Therapy Center and University of Melbourne. They are free, not recorded, and go for one hour.

Previous meetings:

4:30pm (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Joseph Kalisa will be offering reflections.

After the collapse of Afghanistan to Taliban, many Afghans have fled the country, and many are now in shelters or in quarantine around the world. It’s a profoundly difficult and uncertain situation and a traumatic one for all Afghans. Those who have left the country now face the prospect of making a new life in a new country, far from their homeland. Fariba Ahmadi, Abdul Ghaffar Stanikzai and many others Afghans in the diaspora are doing all they can to respond to this crisis.

To prepare for this meeting, please engage with the following papers, webpages and audio resources and then bring your questions for Fariba Ahmadi and Abdul Ghaffar Stanikzai.   

My motherland, my heart: From conversations with children of the Afghan diaspora  
In the days following the Taliban taking control of Kabul, Fariba met with about 20 Afghan boys and girls, 12-14 years old and using narrative practice created this document that is now being shared with new arrivals.

Journeys of faith, strength and persistence: Stories of new arrival Afghan mothers
This is a paper by Fariba describing narrative group work with Afghan mothers.   

Welcoming new arrivals & Surviving the ocean of depression audio resources
Here in Adelaide, Australia, a group of Afghan people has made a welcoming message that is being distributed to those who are currently in quarantine. The letter includes links to audio resources in local languages about ways of ‘surviving the ocean of depression’ that might offer company to those who have had to flee their homelands. The letter of welcome, with links to the audio resources, is available here.  Dr Abdul Ghaffar Stanikzai, who worked at the Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission, is now living in Adelaide and working with Dulwich Centre Foundation. For more information about Dr Stanikzai see this newspaper article.

9:30am (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Jill Freedman will be offering reflections.

It can be difficult to find opportunities to tell and reconsider stories of police or state violence. Speaking out can pose a risk to the person, particularly if the story might connect them to protests or persecuted groups. When a person does tell a story of police brutality, it is likely that they will more richly describe the violence they have experienced than the ways they responded and continue to respond to that violence. Nicolás reflects on particular considerations when working with people who have experienced or been affected by police brutality.

Nicolás Mosso Tupper is a Chilean psychologist with a Master’s degree in Narrative Therapy and Community Work at the University of Melbourne. Nico is based in Adelaide, Australia, and works both in private practice and for a non-government organisation (NGO). He is particularly interested in social injustice and has published articles about clinical therapy and police brutality, both in Chile and Australia. Nico can be contacted by email at nicolas.mosso@mail.udp.cl

To prepare for this meeting, please read Nico’s article and watch his video below

And then bring your questions for Nico!

The meeting will take place for one hour at the following times:

Adelaide – Tuesday 14 September, at 9:30 am
Singapore – Tuesday 14 September, at 8:00 am
Beijing – Tuesday 14 September, at 8:00 am
Hong Kong – Tuesday 14 September, 8:00 am
Auckland – Tuesday 14 September, at 12:00 pm
Vancouver – Monday 13 September, at 5:00 pm
Los Angeles – Monday 13 September, at 5:00 pm
Chicago – Monday 13 September, at 7:00 pm
Atlanta – Monday 13 September, at 8:00 pm
Toronto – Monday 13 September, at 8:00 pm
Santiago – Monday 13 September, at 8:00 pm
Rio de Janeiro – Monday 13 September, at 9:00 pm

Register in advance for this meeting: https://unimelb.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZcvc-mhpjktGdK_ScqCaIu1dEtrrmRZBvtf

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

These events are organised by Dulwich Centre, Evanston Family Therapy Center and University of Melbourne. They are free, not recorded, and go for one hour.

4:30pm (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Joseph Kalisa will be offering reflections.

We’re delighted that the next Meet the Author session is with Ncazelo Ncube-Mlilo. Ncazelo is a highly regarded Narrative Therapist and Psychosocial Specialist who has spent much of her career years focusing on developing local, culturally appropriate psychosocial healing practices and methodologies. She is the founder of Phola (www.phola.org) in South Africa.

Please watch Ncazelo’s video about her COURRAGE Methodology below

 

9:30am (Adelaide time)

Responding to those surviving the unchosen loss of love

This meeting will be facilitated by Zan Maeder. Jill Freedman will provide reflections.

This paper describes how a community worker informed by narrative practice formed a participatory community group in response to those within the community highly influenced by thoughts of self-harm following the loss of love. This paper highlights the privileging of community members’ uncommon knowledge in finding a way forward. The community’s devalued and subjugated knowledge is used to co-create an artful expression of ways group members are taking care following the loss of love, to externalised regret via a playful metaphor, to acknowledge anxiety in a co produced document, to co-author a list of ‘growing group rules’, and to recreate a powerful 50th birthday ritual for a group member. Ethical ways of working are explored to guide community practice. The paper posits that a reclamation of faith in uncommon knowledge might be made all the more possible when devalued knowledge is privileged within a participatory community.

Lauren Sparks is a narrative-ly inspired psychiatric nurse and enthusiastic community worker living within the United States. She uses narrative ways of working to lead numerous community groups currently co-exploring under-acknowledged loss.

To prepare for this session, please read Lauren’s article and watch the below video

4:30pm (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Joseph Kalisa will be offering reflections.

Cat Smith is a proud Aboriginal woman of the Wiradjuri and Yuin Nations. She is an educator and narrative therapist living on the South Coast of NSW. She runs an intuitive and spiritual healing business and works with young people and communities using a narrative approach.

The video and chapter included below describe the Undercover Leadership Project, which developed a series of metaphors drawn from local Dreaming stories to create ripples of change in the lives of young people and Elders in Dubbo, NSW,  who were grappling with the effects of stereotypes, assumptions and other colonising discourses. The project was grounded in strong stories of Aboriginal spirituality and history.

To prepare for this session, please watch the below video and read Cat’s chapter from the book Yarning with a Purpose

Tips to Maintaining Wellbeing & Becoming Strong Leaders: Creating Ripples of Change by Cat Smith

And then bring your questions for Cat!

The meeting will take place for one hour at the following times:

Adelaide – Tuesday, 24 August at 4:30 pm
Brisbane – Tuesday, 24 August at 5 pm
Wellington – Tuesday, 24 August at 7 pm
London – Tuesday, 24 August at 8 am
Paris – Tuesday, 24 August at 9 am
Kigali – Tuesday, 24 August at 9 am
Johannesburg – Tuesday, 24 August at 9 am
Istanbul – Tuesday, 24 August at 10 am
New Delhi – Tuesday, 24 August at 12:30 pm
Singapore – Tuesday, 24 August at 3 pm
Beijing – Tuesday, 24 August at 3 pm  
Hong Kong – Tuesday, 24 August at 3 pm
Tokyo – Tuesday, 24 August at 4 pm

Register in advance for this meeting: https://unimelb.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUqd-2gpj8rGdWxc5fcXkM4pIbuegXiXLFO

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

These events are organised by Dulwich Centre, Evanston Family Therapy Center and University of Melbourne. They are free, not recorded, and go for one hour.

9:30am (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Jill Freedman will be offering reflections.

Privilege is the freedom to ignore things that other people are forced to confront; dramatic things like being gunned down by a vigilante on the way home from a convenience store or less urban and visible things like having to live on secluded parcels of land that no one else wants. Most family therapists enjoy the freedom not to experience such events. Many of the people who come to us for help don’t have that freedom. Gene Combs’ intent in this article was to increase felt awareness of the injustice of institutional racism and to suggest some actions that White family therapists can take to bring forth a more just society in terms of education, housing, access to wealth, and basic safety.

Gene Combs is a family therapist and narrative therapist who lives and works in Evanston, Illinois, USA.   

To prepare for this session, please read Gene’s article

4:30pm (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Joseph Kalisa will be offering reflections.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Shelja Sen’s work with young women dealing with experiences of trauma, gender-based violence and pressure to conform to patriarchal definitions of success took the form of a journey metaphor that could be used across age, class, language and culture. The Courage Map brought a sense of movement and hope in times of despair and immobility. This methodology helped to render visible, externalise and politicise acts of social injustice, turning the gaze back on normative judgment and acknowledging micro-acts of resistance, care and protest (individual or collective). It invited personal agency and counter-stories, documenting, collectivising and inviting contributions to build solidarity. In this paper and video presentation, stories of two young women illustrate how conversations that start in the therapy space can create ripples in our sociocultural and political contexts.

Shelja Sen is a narrative therapist, writer and co-founder of Children First Institute of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, New Delhi, India. She can be contacted at shelja.sen@childrenfirstindia.com

Prior to the session, please read Shelja’s article and watch her video below

9:30am (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Jill Freedman will be offering reflections.

Fostering believed-in-hope is hard, intentional work. Discerning believed-in-hope from optimism and positivity is important in order to maintain an ethical stance for justice-doing.

Vikki Reynolds is an activist/therapist from Vancouver, Canada, who works to bridge the worlds of social justice activism and therapy. Vikki is a white settler of Irish, Newfoundland and English folks, and a heterosexual woman with cisgender privilege.

Riel Dupuis-Rossi is a Two Spirit therapist of Kanienʼkehá꞉ka, Algonquin and Italian descent. Riel grew up in their traditional territories, off reserve in Hamilton, ON and Montreal, QC. Riel has been providing decolonizing and culturally-centered Indigenous trauma therapy to Indigenous adults in the unceded Homelands of the Coast Salish Nations since 2011.

Travis Heath is an adopted, cisgender man from United States of America of mixed racial background (birth father was Pardo, from Brazil, and birth mother of German and Polish descent). Travis works as a psychologist and professor in Denver, Colorado. Travis has a therapy practice that operates on a radical sliding fee scale, and he works with many people on the margins.

Please read the recent paper by Vikki Reynolds, Riel Dupuis-Rossi & Travis Heath which can be downloaded here.

 

The next Meet the Author session features Beata Mukarusanga & Serge Nyirinkwaya

Responding to School Difficulties: The Garden Metaphor & Games, activities and narrative practice

This meeting will be facilitated by Joseph Kalisa.

We look forward to this special Meet the Author event with two authors! Beata Mukarusanga & Serge Nyirinkwaya work with SOS Children’s Villages in Rwanda.

Inspired by the folk cultural methodologies developed by narrative practitioners, such as the Tree of Life and Team of Life, Beata Mukarusanga describes the use of gardening metaphors in work with adults and young people in Rwanda.

While Serge Nyirinkwaya describes a playful practice to assist children and young people who have experienced hard times to respond to traumatic memories from a safe territory, without requiring them to speak in the first person about their experiences. Games and other activities are used to create a shared experience in which young people employ skills and values. These experiences are used as the basis for a cycle of experiential learning in which children reflect on their experiences and make links with their pasts and futures to support alternative story development and rich acknowledgment of what they give value to and their skills of living and being.

To prepare for these meetings, please read Serge and Beata’s articles The garden metaphor and Games, activities and narrative practice: Enabling sparks to emerge in conversations with children and young people who have experienced hard times and watch Serge and Beata’s videos below

4:30pm (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Joseph Kalisa will be offering reflections.

Anthony Newcastle is a descendant of the Tjingali in central Northern Territory and Mutijebin around the coast west from Darwin. Originally from Darwin, Anthony has worked in community development and theatre right through the Northern Territory, through Queensland and remote communities too. Anthony is a graduate of the Master of Narrative Therapy and Community Work and is currently undertaking a PhD in relation to Indigenous masculinities and redistributing social and emotional power.

The paper to read for this session describes work among a group of Aboriginal men who meet regularly in Brisbane. It interweaves stories of individual therapeutic conversations, the development of a community group called Didgeri, which connects people to culture and to each other, and the creation of a social action project to reduce the shame and silence experienced by Aboriginal men who were subjected to sexual abuse in childhood. It explores how narrative therapy ideas have informed this work.

To prepare for this session, read Anthony’s article, Didgeri, individual therapeutic conversations and No More Silence, and watch the following two videos:

9:30am (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Jill Freedman will be offering reflections.

Ian Percy offers ways of conceptualising mindfulness that includes, and diverges from, prevailing discourses and practices. While mindfulness can be thought of as a moment-to-moment non-evaluative or nonjudgmental practice, it is also associated with remembering, imagination and ethics in Buddhist traditions. Various purposes and practices of mindfulness are relevant for therapeutic meetings. In this video, Ian will offer a brief guided method that brings gentle attention to somatic experiences before proposing that mindfulness can assist in sustaining preferred skills and the consolidation of desired values and ethics. These expanded applications of mindfulness can be integrated with storied meaning-making.

Ian Percy is a senior therapist, supervisor, consultant, trainer and published author in narrative and mindfulness approaches. 

To prepare for this meeting, please watch the following video:

 

4:30pm (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations).

Adelite Mukamana was in her early twenties when, as a newly qualified psychologist, she found herself in the position of coordinating a team of equally young and inexperienced colleagues to support survivors of the Genocide Against the Tutsi. In this interview, Adelite describes the process of finding solutions for complex challenges through necessity, and the steps she and her team developed in order to more effectively support those they worked for and with during these profoundly difficult times.

Joseph Kalisa is a younger Rwandan practitioner, a representative of the next generation, who is exploring the intergenerational transmission of survival skills and resistance in Rwanda – a second storyline in relation to what is often described as ‘intergenerational trauma’.

Both Adelite and Joseph are involved in the narrative practice community in Rwanda.

To prepare for this session, please read Adelite’s article Survivors Supporting Survivors (also linked above) and watch Joseph’s video below

9:30am (Adelaide time)

You are invited to this special ‘tribute’ event for John Winslade. As John will be stepping aside from teaching and public professional appearances because of his physical health, this one hour zoom event is an opportunity to acknowledge John’s diverse and profound contributions to the field of narrative therapy and community work. As John is also a dedicated sports enthusiast, this event is inspired by tribute matches in rugby or cricket. In Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand these events are a way of showing respect, honouring and celebrating all that the sports person has offered, both at home and internationally. There are different types of tribute matches. In some situations, the person being celebrated doesn’t have to join the actual game but sits comfortably in the stands … it is a moment of real acknowledgement.   

People from around the globe will either be speaking in person or sending short video recordings to be played at this event. The event is being hosted by Dulwich Centre and Evanston Family Therapy Center. We hope you will join us! 

John’s work has been influential in many realms: narrative counselling in schools, narrative mediation, restorative justice, multicultural counselling and more! He has also been an influential teacher, editor, mentor and supervisor. 

If you are not already familiar with John’s work we have included two videos below and two papers: 

Here is a compilation of clips of John’s teaching, especially compiled for this event by the Vancouver School of Narrative Therapy. [Please note, in some of the workshops featured, John was co-teaching or on a panel with Todd May, Lorraine Hedtke or Stephen Madigan, but the footage has been edited to just focus on John]. 

Here is a video of John speaking about narrative mediation:

Please read and/or watch these and come prepared to share your written reflections in the text about them. You are also most welcome to send us any written testimonies of the influence of John’s ideas in your work to dcp@dulwichcentre.com.au ahead of this meeting. We can then share these with John either during or after the event. Thanks!

4:30pm (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Joseph Kalisa will be offering reflections.

Lani Castan is an Accredited Mental Health Social Worker, who works with children and families. She trained as a child-centred play therapist in Perth, Australia, which she completed in 2016 and completed a Master of Narrative Therapy and Community Work through the Dulwich Centre, in 2019. Lani currently works in schools across the Mornington Peninsula in Victoria, Australia, using both narrative and play therapy, seeing primary school aged children and their families.

To prepare for this meeting, please read Lani’s article Child-centred play therapy and narrative therapy: Consilience and synthesis and watch the video below

 

9:30am (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Jill Freedman will be offering reflections.

Narrative Walks is a hope-based, depathologising outdoor program that was developed to engage with populations who may not be drawn to conventional methods of therapy. This structured day program encourages participants to explore 15 narrative therapy questions, and to engage in a number of other activities during a 20 kilometre walk through the bush. The program invites different perspectives on problem stories, and offers walking as a narrative metaphor. In this video Chris outlines his own hopes for the future development of Narrative Walks as a program transferable to many people and lands.

Chris Darmody has spent a large part of the past fifteen years working with young people and currently works in private practice in Perth, Western Australia. Chris is the founder of Embark, a service which develops and runs a number of therapeutic programs held outdoors in an attempt to address issues of power, connect people to their environments and engage with populations which may not engage with indoor therapy.

To prepare for this meeting, please watch Chris’ video below

Tuesday 1st June

4:30pm (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Joseph Kalisa will be offering reflections.

Carolyn Markey has considerable experience and great interest in counselling children, young people, and their families or caregivers in relation to a broad range of problems that are affecting their lives. Carolyn has particular experience in the areas of family separation, effects of violence and abuse, school-related difficulties, and working with people affected by concerns about anxiety or depression. She is a key member of the Dulwich Centre faculty.

Earlier this year Carolyn contributed to the development of a series of e-learning courses around the theme of ‘Engaging Children’, produced by Emerging Minds. This ‘meet the author’ session will focus on practices for enabling children to describe problems in their own terms and in ways that are meaningful and useful for them.

The following videos provide you with the opportunity to view video practice demonstrations of Carolyn and another practitioner, Jamie Lee, working with child and parent actors, as well as the practitioners and child actors reflecting on the demonstrations.

Practice demonstration

Reflection on practice

These videos are from Emerging Minds’ Engaging Children: Shrinking problems free e-learning course (see https://emergingminds.com.au/online-course/engaging-children-shrinking-problems/ ), Module 3 ‘Calling it what it is’. In addition to these videos the module includes interviews with other practitioners, reflection questions and an opportunity to submit your own comments for inclusion in the course.

4:30pm (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Joseph Kalisa (Rwanda) will be offering reflections.

Loretta Pederson is an Australian narrative practitioner who works on the lands of the Dharug and Eora nations in Sydney. She completed the Masters of Narrative Therapy and Community Work in 2014, and since that time has been working for Dulwich Centre as a tutor and teacher. Loretta has worked for many years in non-government organisations, offering counselling and supervision, and also is in private practice. Loretta has long had a passion for working with women who have survived physical and sexual assault. After reading the attached article, come along with your questions and also hear about where this work has gone in recent years – including deconstructing tactics of power in workplace sexual harassment and assault, and working with men who have been subjected to assault by religious leaders.

To prepare for this meeting, please review Loretta’s article: Sharing sadness and finding small pieces of justice: acts of resistance and acts of reclaiming in working with women who’ve been subjected to abuse

The next Meet the Author session features Kelsi Semeschuk

Learnings from Michael White’s video archive and some reflections on the practice of ‘critique’   

Tuesday 11th May

9:30am (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Jill Freedman will be offering reflections.

Kelsi Semeschuk (she/her) is a Canadian who lives and works on Kaurna Land, in Adelaide, South Australia. Kelsi completed the Masters of Narrative Therapy and Community Work (MNTCW)  in 2018 and has been a tutor for the program ever since. Kelsi is also currently completing a PhD through the University of Melbourne on Michael White’s video archive, which features video-recordings from his therapeutic and teaching work. The focus of her research is on how Michael White responded to people with experiences of abuse and Kelsi is endeavouring to link these learnings to the therapeutic work of current narrative practitioners in the field. 

To prepare for this meeting, please read Kelsi’s article ‘Refusing to separate critique from respect’ and watch her video below:

The next Meet the Author session features Ian Maund

Using the Soundtrack of Your Life to engage with young people

Tuesday 4th May

4:30pm (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Joseph Kalisa (Rwanda) will be offering reflections.

Ian (wakunwakun) is a Waribarra man from Far North Queensland Australia. Ian lives in Brisbane and works at an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander NGO based in the Northern suburbs of Brisbane. Within his work with young people involved with or at risk of entering into the youth justice system, he has developed the Soundtrack of Your Life Narrative Therapy methodology.  

To prepare for this meeting, please watch Ian’s video:

The next Meet the Author session features Cathy Richardson

What is healing and from what are we needing to heal: A journey of healing from cancer

Tuesday 27th April

9:30am (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Jill Freedman will be offering reflections.

Cathy Richardon/Kinewesquao is a Métis scholar and current Director of First Peoples Studies at Concordia University in Montreal. In this session, Cathy will be responding to questions about two chapters from her recent book, Facing the Mountain: Indigenous Healing in the Shadow of Colonialism.

To prepare for this meeting, please read the following two chapters:

And then bring your questions for Cathy!

The next Meet the Author session features David Newman

‘Dictionary of Obscure Experiences’ & placing anxiety and depression in context

Tuesday 20th April

4:30pm (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Joseph Kalisa (Rwanda) will be offering reflections.

This Meet the Author is with narrative therapist David Newman and his work with young people experiencing significant mental health struggles. To prepare for this discussion, please read the following two pieces. One is an earlier paper ‘Using narrative practices with anxiety and depression’ and the other is the current version of ‘A Dictionary of Obscure Experiences’ generated from the lived wisdom of young people.

The next Meet the Author session features Lúcia Helena Abdalla

Narrative responses to the pandemic in Brazil

Tuesday 13th April

9:30am (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Jill Freedman will be offering reflections.

As the pandemic continues to ravage Brazil, narrative practitioners are seeking to respond in creative and thoughtful ways. Please read the following three pieces by Lúcia Helena Abdalla and Recycling Minds and then bring your questions to ask Lúcia!

 

The next Meet the Author session features Marnie Sather

Illuminating skills and knowledges of women who have lost a male partner to suicide: A feminist insider narrative practice research project

Tuesday 30th March

9:30am (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations). Jill Freedman will be offering reflections.

Marnie has just submitted her PhD thesis about her feminist insider research! For this Meet the Author, please watch the below seminar Marnie recently gave and bring your questions!

The next Meet the Author session features Mehmet Dinc

4 collective projects from Turkish narrative practitioner Mehmet Dinc

Tuesday 23rd March

4:30pm (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations).

This one hour zoom session is a chance to discuss with Mehmet Dinc four recent collective projects. Please view these all prior to attending the session:

And then bring your questions for Mehmet!

The meeting will take place for one hour at the following times:

Adelaide – Tuesday, 23 March at 4:30 pm
Brisbane – Tuesday, 23 March at 4 pm
Wellington – Tuesday, 23 March at 7 pm
Beijing – Tuesday, 23 March at 2 pm
Hong Kong – Tuesday, 23 March at 2 pm
Tokyo – Tuesday, 23 March at 3 pm
Kigali – Tuesday, 23 March at 8 am
Johannesburg – Tuesday, 23 March at 8 am
London – Tuesday, 23 March at 6 am
Paris – Tuesday, 23 March at 7 am

9:30am (Adelaide time)

Tileah Drahm-Butler is an Aboriginal woman of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations of Queensland, Australia and lives in Cairns, North Queensland. Tileah is a social worker with a Master of Narrative Therapy and Community Work. Tileah works in the emergency department of a busy regional hospital and is on the Dulwich Centre International Teaching Faculty where she leads the teaching of narrative therapy and community work through an Aboriginal lens in Australia and internationally. Tileah has also been appointed as Co-chair of Feminisms, Intersectionality and Narrative Practice at Dulwich Centre.

This meeting will be facilitated by Joseph Kalisa (Rwanda). Jill Freedman (United States) will be offering reflections.

To prepare for this Meet the Author, please read this chapter by Tileah from the book Aboriginal Narrative Practice: Honouring Storylines of Pride, Strength and Creativity, Tileah’s Friday Afternoon Video and the below video with Zan Maeder and Tileah about decolonising gender and sexuality.

And then bring your questions for Tileah!

4:30pm (Adelaide time)

Jill Faulkner comes from Aotearoa (NZ); however, she has lived more of her life on Aboriginal lands than on her own grandfather’s country. She has worked with children, families and communities for more than 30 years. Jill’s thinking and work are shaped by the multiple relationships and storied journeys that she has travelled alongside these folks. Jill is a grassroots worker committed to supporting space for people to engage in healing of past hurts and to work for systemic and structural reform.

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations).

To prepare for this meeting, please read this chapter by Jill Faulkner Responding to women in prison who have used interpersonal violence: a narrative approach disrupting binaries’

This chapter was recently published in the book Intersecting Stories: Narrative therapy reflections on gender, culture and justice

And then bring your questions for Jill!

9:30am (Adelaide time)

David Newman, a narrative therapist, generates and shares ‘living documents’ created from the words of young people at a youth in-patient mental health unit.

To prepare for this Meet the Author, please read David’s article: Explorations with the written word in an inpatient mental health unit for young people

And the resource The things to get you through – Young people’s tips.

And then bring your questions for David!

Your host will be Tileah Drahm-Butler. Jill Freedman will also be offering reflections.

4:30pm (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler (of the Darumbal/Kulilli and Wanyurr Majay Yidinji Nations).

The next Meet the Author session is a chance to talk with Zan from Rad Counselling (https://www.radcounselling.com.au/) about their work with queer young people and their loved ones.

Please watch Zan/Rosie’s video

Read their article Queer Invitations: Fostering connection between queer young people and their loved ones and have a look at this thoughtful resource: Talking about pronouns and gendered language

9:30am (Adelaide time)

This meeting will be facilitated by Tileah Drahm-Butler.

“At the time I had this conversation with Michael White I was part of the group that produced the American Family Therapy Academy newsletter. We had created a series of questions to ask a number of prominent family therapists. Luckily Michael was happy to use these questions as a starting point for a conversation, rather than as a limitation for what we might talk about. This is a portion of that interview. It gives me great pleasure to revisit it. I hope you too enjoy it.” Jill Freedman

To prepare for this meeting please watch this video recording of Jill Freedman interviewing Michael White: