• Creating stories of hope: A narrative approach to illness, death and grief— Lorraine Hedtke Quick View

    A narrative approach allows psychosocial teams to stand alongside children who have cancer, or life-threatening illnesses, and their families at critical times and to create stories of agency. Rather than dwelling on stories of loss and despair that potentially enfeeble families, a narrative approach builds on stories of strength that engender hope by asking questions that separate the person from the problem. Developing such stories supports people in taking action against the effects of cancer. It also facilitates the formation of a legacy that can sustain family members, even after the death of a child. This legacy serves as the foundation for remembering the dead, folding their stories into the lives of the living, and constructing lines of relational connection that can transcend physical death. Not only do families benefit from this approach, but the psychosocial team that provides professional and medical services can be uplifted through witnessing practices of strength and love in the face of hardship.

  • Michael White: Fragments of an Event— John Winslade & Lorraine Hedtke with an introduction by David Epston Quick View

    We present here fragments, reconstructed from memory, of Michael White’s last workshop. These fragments are interspersed with descriptions of events that took place in San Diego in the days leading up to Michael’s death. Our focus here is not on the medical details, nor on the private family stories, but on the task of recording Michael’s last efforts to teach. Our hope is to play a small part in allowing his words to continue to resonate.

  • Still alive: Counselling conversations with parents whose child has died during or soon after pregnancy— Helene Grau Kristensen and Lorraine Hedtke Quick View

    When a baby dies, before or after his or her birth, we (counsellors and lay people alike) are often at a loss as to how to help. This article addresses the delicate conversations needed to demonstrate how relational narratives can live on after the death of a baby whether he or she dies in utero, miscarried or born still. Using re-membering practices and narrative counselling, we explore how a deceased child’s ongoing identity can continue to inform sustaining narratives for those living with grief.

  • The Origami of Remembering— Lorraine Hedtke Quick View

    When so much of work in the realm of grief has focused on ‘letting go’ and ‘saying goodbye’ to those who have died, the ideas in this paper offer an alternative path. When working with people who are living with grief, finding ways to honour and ‘keep alive’ the relationship with the person who has died can be sustaining and hopeful. In this paper, Lorraine introduces the metaphor of ‘origami of remembering’, using it to describe the process of folding and re-folding the stories of people’s lives and how they are linked to those who have passed away.

    • The Origami of Remembering— Lorraine Hedtke Quick View
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    • The Origami of Remembering— Lorraine Hedtke
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    • When so much of work in the realm of grief has focused on ‘letting go’ and ‘saying goodbye’ to those who have died, the ideas in this paper offer an alternative path. When working with people who are living with grief, finding ways to honour and ‘keep alive’ the relationship with the person who has died can be sustaining and…
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