• Children, Parents and Mental Health— The Dulwich Centre Quick View

    This article presents initial material generated by the Children, Parents and Mental Health Project. It contains a collection of stories from children of parents with mental health difficulties, and serves not only as collective therapeutic document and a document of alternative knowledge about this topic, but also as a source of questions for those working with people whose parent has experienced mental health problems.

    • Children, Parents and Mental Health— The Dulwich Centre Quick View
    • ,
    • Children, Parents and Mental Health— The Dulwich Centre
    • $9.90
    • This article presents initial material generated by the Children, Parents and Mental Health Project. It contains a collection of stories from children of parents with mental health difficulties, and serves not only as collective therapeutic document and a document of alternative knowledge about this topic, but also as a source of questions for those working with people whose parent has…
    • Add to cart
  • Conversations with Divorced Parents: Disarming the Conflict and Developing Skills of Collaboration— Anne Kathrine Løge Quick View

    Parents who have divorced often experience conflict-saturated accounts of each other and their relationship. This paper shares some narrative approaches which seek to help divorced parents ‘disarm the conflict’ and develop skills of collaboration. This work involves exploring each parent’s preferred values and purposes with linguagrams, inviting divorced parents to act as outsider witnesses for each other, and inviting in other divorced parents to act as outsider witnesses for the parents seeking therapy.

  • Sharing Stories: The Work of an Experience Consultant— Ellen Walnum Quick View

    This paper introduces the concept of Experience Consultant. Ellen Walnum is a Norwegian woman with the experience of growing up with a mother who had psychiatric difficulties. She has also had the experience of a mental health crisis. Determined to put these experiences to work for the benefit of others, Ellen is now employed as an Experience Consultant working with professionals, with mothers who have psychiatric difficulties and with their children. This paper describes some of the key skills involved in the work of Experience Consultants. It also offers a vision for re-thinking mental health services as partnerships built on a combination of ‘professional knowledge’ and ‘experience knowledge’. This paper was crafted from an interview1 and was delivered as a keynote address at the 8th International Narrative Therapy and Community Work Conference, which was held at Agder University College in Kristiansand, Norway, June 2007.

  • Growing up with Parents with Mental Health Difficulties— Ruth Pluznick and Natasha Kis-Sines Quick View

    This paper documents a project with young people who are growing up with a parent with mental health difficulties. The authors discuss how they are able to employ the narrative practice ‘double-listening’ to stories by the young people – listening not only to the challenges that this experience brought, but also asking about the skills, knowledges and opportunities the young people used to respond to these. This and the other narrative principles that informed the project – such as co-research and ‘enabling contribution’ are demonstrated by the inclusion of a therapeutic document from work with a young man, and a transcript of a conversation with a young woman and her mother.

  • Navigating relationships when our children are in out-of-home care: A narrative group and community project for parents whose lives are affected by child protection intervention and the removal of their children— Lauren Graham Quick View

    This article describes a group work process designed to both privilege and document the skills and knowledges of parents whose children are in out-of-home care as a result of statutory intervention. The group focused on salvaging preferred territories of identity. It was designed to enable the contribution of participants by linking their narratives with those of other parents facing similar circumstances, and providing opportunities to inform the work of a local organisation developing practices for family inclusion. As part of this group project, parents were able to identify steps they need to take to redress the actions and ideas that led to child removal, and, in doing so, to develop their practices for caring for and protecting children.

  • Moments to treasure: Narrative family therapy with trans children and cisgender parents — David Nylund Quick View

    David Nylund’s primary work is at the Gender Health Center in Sacramento, California, with family members, caregivers, and parents of young trans and gender diverse folks. David works primarily with parents to invite them to come to a place of supporting and affirming their child’s gender identity. This interview explores the ways in which he engages in narrative family therapy in this context.

  • When Your Child is Diagnosed with Schizophrenia: The Skills and Knowledges of Parents— Amanda Worrall Quick View

    This article documents work with a group of parents in Central Australia who have a son or daughter who has been diagnosed with schizophrenia. The first part of the article collects some of the parents’ reflections on the effects of schizophrenia on their lives and their ways of responding to them, while the second part is a collective document produced with the group about their skills and knowledges. This group work has led to the production of a larger booklet for the wider community, as well as networking and partnering with local community mental health organisations, and advocacy and lobbying of politicians and health services.

  • From Stigma and Isolation to Strength and Solidarity: Parents Talking About Their Experiences of Caring for Children Whose Behaviour Has Been Sexually Concerning or Harmful— Judith Milner, and lots of others Quick View

    This is the story of how a group of parents who were caring for children whose behaviour had been sexually concerning or harmful, transformed their lives. In the process, they also transformed a service!

  • That’s the Question: Using Questions to Help Parents to Get to Know Their Children and Allay Anxiety and Anger— Darylle Levenbach Quick View

    When families are caught up in ‘stormy’ relationships, it can be challenging to negotiate a different way of communicating about what each person values. This article suggests a range of questions that parents and young people can use to play the role of an ‘investigative reporter’ and find out about the other’s hopes, dreams, and knowledge. The author provides two examples of these questions – and the process that goes with them – in therapeutic contexts with families in Israel.

  • Gathering Stories About Growing Up with a Parent with Mental Health Difficulties— Shona Russell Quick View

    This project aims to gather stories that relate to the experience of children whose parents or carers have/had serious mental health difficulties. The project is seeking stories that not only richly acknowledge the difficulties faced, but also the skills and knowledge of children in these situations and the many different facets of the relationships between parents and child. It is hoped that a resource will be developed for children and for practitioners. This paper introduces this project, provides a list of questions to assist people in describing their experiences, and contains some examples of stories.

  • Haunting from the Future: A Congenial Approach to Parent-children Conflicts—  David Epston, Cherelyn Lakusta, and Karl Tomm Quick View

    This paper describes a novel approach to parent-children conflicts. It has been developed in response to situations when the present is particularly vexatious or where parties are passionately committed to their respective position which requires each to either defend it, or attack the rectitude of the other, and where to relent or even hesitate would risk loss of face.

  • Overcoming Overwhelming— Ross Hernandez Quick View

    This paper explores ways to richly describe parents’ skills and knowledges in dealing with problems that threaten to overwhelm their lives, especially in the context of raising children with significant challenges. The narrative practices of externalising conversations, tracing values, outsider-witness conversations, and therapeutic letters and documents were used with parents facing various problems.

    • Overcoming Overwhelming— Ross Hernandez Quick View
    • ,
    • Overcoming Overwhelming— Ross Hernandez
    • $9.90
    • This paper explores ways to richly describe parents’ skills and knowledges in dealing with problems that threaten to overwhelm their lives, especially in the context of raising children with significant challenges. The narrative practices of externalising conversations, tracing values, outsider-witness conversations, and therapeutic letters and documents were used with parents facing various problems.
    • Add to cart
Close Menu
0
×
×

Cart