• My favourite questions— Jill Freedman Quick View

    This paper, which began as a part of a plenary address at the 10th International Narrative Therapy Conference in Salvador, Brazil, offers 3 sets of questions that the author names as ‘favourites’ in her work. The first 2 sets of questions are questions that therapists can ask clients in therapy conversations. The first set may help people link their lives with others. The second may help people organise their experience into narratives. The third is a question that therapists can ask themselves to help them come to questions that promote experiential involvement.

    • My favourite questions— Jill Freedman Quick View
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    • My favourite questions— Jill Freedman
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    • This paper, which began as a part of a plenary address at the 10th International Narrative Therapy Conference in Salvador, Brazil, offers 3 sets of questions that the author names as ‘favourites’ in her work. The first 2 sets of questions are questions that therapists can ask clients in therapy conversations. The first set may help people link their lives…
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  • That’s the Question: Using Questions to Help Parents to Get to Know Their Children and Allay Anxiety and Anger— Darylle Levenbach Quick View

    When families are caught up in ‘stormy’ relationships, it can be challenging to negotiate a different way of communicating about what each person values. This article suggests a range of questions that parents and young people can use to play the role of an ‘investigative reporter’ and find out about the other’s hopes, dreams, and knowledge. The author provides two examples of these questions – and the process that goes with them – in therapeutic contexts with families in Israel.

  • Keys to a subjugated story: My favourite narrative therapy questions— Marta Campillo Quick View

    This paper was given as a keynote address at the 10th International Narrative Therapy and Community Work Conference held in Salvador, Brazil, in July 2010. The author was asked to speak on her ‘favourite narrative therapy questions’. Here, Marta Campillo describes ways in which questions informed by the concept of the ‘absent but implicit’ can act as keys to open subjugated stories.

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