Enabling forgiveness and reconciliation in family therapy— Karl Tomm

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in | 0 comments

Enabling forgiveness and reconciliation in family therapy— Karl Tomm

$5.50

Interpersonal conflicts are almost inevitable within families. The closeness and intensity of family relationships along with differences among family members in knowledge, desires, values, abilities, etc., account for much of this turmoil. Family members are often deeply hurt in the course of their conflicts and sometimes there is a significant breach of trust. Occasionally a family member will consider a certain offence unforgivable and will not seek reconciliation. Usually, however, family members try to recover a sense of personal and relationship wellbeing by endeavoring to forgive and reconcile. This can be a long and arduous process. Therapists are often consulted to facilitate such healing. My purpose in writing this paper is to share my understanding of some of the complexities involved.2 The perspective that I adopt is a social constructionist or ‘bringforthist’ stance. I assume that through caring conversation, it is possible to bring forth preferred ways of thinking and interacting that can lead to forgiveness and reconciliation.

Get access to all our articles with a Dulwich Centre Reading Room— one year subscription or Reading Room Membership for Institutions, or log in if you are a member.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

0