• Narrative Therapy Outcomes for Women who have Experienced Domestic Violence— Emma Bullen Quick View

    Debate continues about what constitutes evidence for outcomes of psychological interventions. There are challenges to operationalise research for post-modernist views of knowledge being multiple and relative rather than singular, fixed, and absolute. This has led to limited empirical evaluation of practices such as narrative therapy.

    This paper describes the therapy process for eighty women and outcomes for twenty-three women who had experienced domestic violence and were engaged in narrative therapy, utilising the Partners for Change Outcome Management System (PCOMS). PCOMS consists of integrating two outcome rating scales into each counselling session – the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) and the Session Rating Scale (SRS). The design of the research was clinical data mining.

    This paper briefly discusses difficulties and limitations of the concept of evidence-based practice when applied to narrative therapy. The study identifies and defines several different patterns of therapy outcomes. PCOMS was used to demonstrate that clients who were treated for at least six, one-hour sessions of narrative therapy for complex trauma (domestic violence), showed positive outcomes equivalent to other studies using different treatments.

  • Mothers take action: Fostering solidarity and reappropriating social and political space through a collective creative project— Florence Godmaire-Duhaime, Anne-Marie Bellemare, Sebrena Caine and Alan Behary Laul-Sirder Quick View

    This paper presents a case study and analysis of the use of creative arts and narrative tools in the practice of social work, with a particular focus on fostering solidarity and social change. We describe an innovative project aimed at tackling oppression with a group by and for migrant mothers in Montreal. First, we discuss how arts practices can be used to connect with ourselves and to nurture a collective consciousness. Second, we show how creative writing and the narrative process can offer a way of connecting in a community-based group, and can foster community empowerment. Third, we develop the idea that the dissemination of a collectively created artwork can create connections with the broader community and function as a tool for social change.

  • Narrative therapy at any age— Dafna Stern Quick View

    This article recounts the author’s explorations in narrative therapy in conversations with two centenarians living in a nursing home. Through focussing on the elderly people’s own skills and knowledges of life, externalised conversations about death, and conversations about making contributions to others, new and renewed accounts of life were created, in a context where this might often be unexpected.

    • Narrative therapy at any age— Dafna Stern Quick View
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    • Narrative therapy at any age— Dafna Stern
    • $9.90
    • This article recounts the author’s explorations in narrative therapy in conversations with two centenarians living in a nursing home. Through focussing on the elderly people’s own skills and knowledges of life, externalised conversations about death, and conversations about making contributions to others, new and renewed accounts of life were created, in a context where this might often be unexpected.
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  • The art of teaching— Phebe Sessions Quick View

    This piece is an extract from an interview with Phebe Sessions, a family therapist who for the last twenty six years has taught social workers at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts. This piece describes a number of themes including caring for teachers, diversifying authority, responding to students’ past experiences of trauma, and articulating the similarities and differences between teaching and therapy.

    • The art of teaching— Phebe Sessions Quick View
    • ,
    • The art of teaching— Phebe Sessions
    • $5.50
    • This piece is an extract from an interview with Phebe Sessions, a family therapist who for the last twenty six years has taught social workers at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts. This piece describes a number of themes including caring for teachers, diversifying authority, responding to students’ past experiences of trauma, and articulating the similarities and differences between teaching and…
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