Chapter 2 — Cultural partnerships

How do workers, women and men and people of different cultures in an agency or institution, protect against gender and cultural bias in their work on a day-to-day basis? Furthermore, how do they do this in societies where sexist and racist assumptions are an integral part of the upbringing and way of life, as they are in most modern industrial states? (Tamasese & Waldegrave, 2003, p. 82)

One of the many significant contributions of the Just Therapy Team is the way they developed cultural and gender partnerships amongst their own team. In this video, Charles responds to an invitation from Taimalieutu to speak about the importance of purposeful cultural partnerships in terms of ending marginalisation from a dominant cultural perspective. Later in the video, Taimalieutu speaks to the concepts of partnership from a Samoan perspective.

To enable you to read more about partnerships and accompanying accountabilities we have included here two key articles:

Chapter 2 references

Tamasese, T. K. & Waldegrave, C. (2003). Cultural and gender accountability in the ‘just therapy’ approach. In C. Waldegrave, T. K. Tamasese, F. Tuhaka & W. Campbell (Eds.), Just Therapy – a journey: A collection of papers from the Just Therapy Team, New Zealand (pp. 81-96). Dulwich Centre Publications.

Tamasese, T., Waldegrave, C., Tuhaka, F. & Campbell, W. (2003). Furthering conversation about partnerships of accountability: Talking about issues of leadership, ethics and care. In C. Waldegrave, T. K. Tamasese, F. Tuhaka & W. Campbell (Eds.), Just Therapy – a journey: A collection of papers from the Just Therapy Team, New Zealand (pp. 97-119). Dulwich Centre Publications.

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