2016

Posted by on Sep 17, 2016 in | 0 comments

Showing 17–31 of 31 results

  • Expanding the landscape: Narrative practice in rehabilitation services for adults affected by intellectual disability in Hong Kong— Ocean Hung

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    This article proposes the adaptation of narrative practice to the field of psychological services for adult persons affected by intellectual disability. The author advocates such adaptation in order to help anchor the agenda of rehabilitation service to the service users’ hopes and dreams instead of the traditional notion of ‘behavioral problems’.

    In particular, the author discusses the use of narrative-based practices to facilitate the service users’ participation in the co-construction of identity conclusions about themselves and their relationship with others within the care system. The use of narrative ideas and enquires in case consultation is discussed. In addition, three extended practices, namely ‘Group re-authoring’, ‘Identity revisiting documentation’ and ‘Action dialogue’ are described and illustrated with stories of two service users.

  • Explorations with the written word in an inpatient mental health unit for young people— David Newman

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    In this paper David discusses the concept of the spoken word being ‘relatively unavailable’ to the people he works with at a Sydney based psychiatric unit for young people. He discusses some of his use of the written word in responding to this relative unavailability. This includes some fine tuning of the use of the written word by considering; language use that minimises the risk of people rejecting themselves, utilising the concept of people ‘getting their language through the language of others’, ways to use Michael White and David Epston’s concept of ‘failure proofing’ questions and crafting questions that come out of the dilemmas of therapeutic work. Finally, the ethics of documenting and living documentation more particularly is discussed.

  • Finding refuge: A travelling ‘Tree of Knowledge’— Aliki Meimaridou

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    This paper traces the journey of a ‘Travelling Tree of Knowledge’. It represents an endeavour to identify, honour and exchange knowledge about what sustains interpreters who have previously been refugees and who are now working with refugees. Emerging from the author’s engagement in narrative therapy, it details a budding practice of documentation and exchange.

  • Playing and narrative therapy: Synthesising narrative practice and occupational therapy in work with children— Christine Ullmann

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    This article explores combining occupational therapy with practices from narrative therapy. The contexts of play allows a site for working with both children’s physical challenges, as well as dominant problem stories. Throughout the paper, examples of work with individual children show the links between occupational and narrative practices, specifically in relation to situating problems outside of children, the use of scaffolding both conversations and physical challenges, and developing alternative stories that help children renegotiate relationships with the problems in their lives.

  • How we deal with ‘way out thoughts’: A living document … Ways of talking with young people about suicidal thoughts— David Newman

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    In this paper, I describe some of the ways that I use the written word, in the form of ‘living documents’, to enable the sharing of stories and know-how about the ways young people deal with suicidal thoughts, or what are also termed ‘way out thoughts’ or ‘die thoughts’. These explorations take place in my work with young people in a psychiatric unit. I share here an example of a one-to-one conversation and also describe how I collect and use stories in a group work or collective context. The young people I speak with have let me know that such conversations and shared documents are important to them.

  • Letter writing in two contexts: Facilitating stories of resistance— Renee Butler

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    This article explores some of the ways in which narrative therapy letter writing can assist in facilitating double-storied testimonies for women in two work contexts, family support work and crisis response. It briefly introduces the reader to some of the women and children who have been involved in this therapeutic letter-writing process and gives the reader a glimpse into some of the narrative letters that have been exchanged. It discusses how letters can richly acknowledge women’s skills and knowledges, especially when working in an environment with strict time pressures, and discusses some of the ways that narrative letters can be incorporated into a busy work environment..

  • Narrating creativity: Developing an emic, first person approach to creativity research— Mandy Chilcott and Daved Barry

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    Despite the complexity of workplace creativity, laboratory or survey-based quantitative research conducted in the positivist tradition supports a trend towards prescriptive ‘recipied’ lists for stimulating creativity. In contrast, by recognising creativity as a complex multi-level system, we were inspired by ideas from narrative therapy to develop a new narrative inquiry methodology that uses personal storytelling to collaboratively investigate, promote intelligent reflection on, and enhance the creativity process.

    Our aim was to explore how taking a pragmatic constructivist approach might unfold a new way of eliciting richly descriptive realworld information that exploits local situated knowledge (what we call ‘emic creativity’) about the individual and group creative processes within a workplace. Using a developmental application of the methodology as a single-level case study on gaming designers in Denmark, we found that the new emic creativity methodology can contribute valuable information about creativity within a particular system.

  • What’s in a game? Narrative therapy approaches with people who have relationships with gaming and online communities— Dale Andersen-Giberson

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    This article outlines various approaches in working with people who have relationships with gaming and online communities, and includes transcripts to share the co-learning that unfolded in narrative conversations. Discoveries include the helpfulness of using narrative therapy to enlist positioning around gaming and the vast possibilities that exist for unpacking the significance of online communities as arenas for preferred identity construction.

  • First steps towards an alternative suicide risk screening tool: Navigating risk assessment and encouraging life-sustaining conversations— Carly Forster and Rina Taub

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    This paper explores preferred ways of working in relation to suicide screening in situations where this is a requirement of professional practice. We describe our concerns about how approaches to ‘suicide risk assessment’ were affecting our work and the young people we were required to assess. We came to see the assessment process as an intervention of itself, with the potential for negative consequences for young people, workers and the therapeutic relationship. In response, we drew on a narrative and post-structuralist framework to develop an alternative set of assessment questions. Our questionnaire is intended to scaffold conversations that externalise the problem, elicit people’s life-sustaining practices, and enable assessment of distress and suicidal thoughts. The questionnaire has so far been trialled by a young person and psychologist in Sydney, and an adult and mental health worker in Singapore. We present our findings about these insiders’ experiences of the questionnaire. We hope this article will invite readers to connect to curiosity about ways of having conversations that open up space for people to speak of despair, and questions about living, in ways that are respectful and encouraging of life-sustaining steps.

  • Language Justice: Narrative therapy on the fringes of Colombian magical realism— marcela polanco

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    When problems can talk, dead people can speak, hope can taste, and heart, soul and mind can dance together, a new discursive space is brought to life in therapeutic conversations. In this paper I discuss the reimagination of narrative therapy into my Colombian culture, adopting magical realism as a literary means to engage the imagination in therapeutic conversations. I transgress mainstream rational epistemological traditions of evidence to situate narrative therapy practice on the fringes of convention. I bring to the forefront the ordinary weirdness of narrative therapy conversations via the magical realism’s absurdity and creativity. I stage the discussion in Gabriel García Márquez’s Macondo in his novels to speak the unspeakable, to locate the unlocatable, to touch the untouchable, to hear the inaudible, and to utter the ineffable in our lives.

  • A narrative approach to addressing pain in hospitalised paediatric patients: Handicraft and digital interventions—

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    Children who have to stay in hospital for a period of time can experience anxiety, fear and insecurity. Narrative therapy has been used to help address the traumatic experiences of hospitalised paediatric patients by promoting changes in perspective, enabling distance from pain or trauma, and identifying skills and strategies for managing the hospitalisation process. To determine the effectiveness of narrative-based interventions on reducing the negative effects associated with hospitalisation, we conducted a trial with paediatric patients in four hospitals in Mexico. Using a narrative approach that involved externalising conversations, drawing and collage, we trialled both digital and handicraft interventions. Both interventions reduced perceived pain, generated positive associations with hospital and improved patient wellbeing. However, the digital intervention, using existing applications on a digital tablet, proved a richer medium. Considering that in Mexico hospitalised paediatric patients’ care is almost entirely medical, this digital health proposal represents an improvement to health services through a more comprehensive approach to the wellbeing of hospitalised paediatric patients.

  • ‘Weird and scary stuff’: Diverse spiritual experiences about death in Australia— Steve Rose

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    Rich opportunities await the narrative therapist when space is opened in narrative re-membering practices to incorporate those experiences of death and dying that are often thought of as too ‘weird and scary’ ‒ or simply as just ‘a bit too strange or mystical’ to be treated as privileged experiences. This paper suggests that far from deserving to be avoided or totally ignored, these stories offer rich opportunities for exploration. Using a narrative lens, and drawing on the already known practices of narrative re-membering, the author unpacks some of his own stories privileging unusual and, at times, transcendent experiences. The article then outlines how such stories fit within a narrative framework. Finally, a number of suggestions are canvassed for how narrative questions related to these ‘weird and scary stories’ may be framed.

  • Deconstructing Emotion: A review of “The book of human emotions” by Tiffany Watt Smith— Zoy Kazan

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    Deconstructing Emotion: A review of “ The book of human emotions” by Tiffany Watt Smith

  • Narrative dream analysis? Towards a narrative therapy response to acknowledging people’s responses in dreams— Ron Findlay

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    This article starts with a brief overview and critique of classic dream analysis, then follows with a review of a sample of published narrative therapy approaches to dream analysis and working with dreams. He then outlines another possible approach focussing on attending to unique outcomes, initiatives, and responses in dreams already occurred.

  • Gender belonging: Children, adolescents, adults and the role of the therapist – Revised— Esben Esther Pirelli Benestad

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    This paper, originally published in 2001 and then revised 15 years later, describes key principles and practice of Esben Esther Pirelli Benestad, a Norweigian transgifted medical doctor and family therapist, when working with the families and networks of children and adolescents who display non-conformist or atypical gender expressions. This piece offers definitions for a wide variety of words and terms used to describe complex realms of gender, explores how responses to gender non-conformity have changed over time and continue to change, and conveys ways of ensuring that individuals displaying unusual expressions of gender have a chance to experience a sense of positive gender belonging.

2,022 Comments

  1. in what ways have you entered into collaborations before? What made these collaborations possible?

    As a peer worker most of my work was entering into collaborations with young people. I would use curiosity to further inquire into their experience, and looking back wow these narrative practices would have been amazing to use in our youth group discussions! We would use art mostly in telling stories. Many of the young people heard voices and saw characters only they could see. They would enjoy painting these voices, externalising the character, giving it a name and talking about the story and nature of the relationship between the voice and the character. I also enjoyed illiciting these stories, as I could tell they would begin to separate themselves from the voices, allowing for guilt and shame to reduce.

    What might make it hard to enter into these practices?

    The one difficult way of entering into these practices was the note writing. The managerial culture of my last workplace meant it was not considered good practice to have clients sit with us to write notes. In fact most clients probably were unaware that workers did regularly make notes each time they had contact with the centre. We were a strengths based centre that thrived on person centred practice. I think there is a bit of a stereotype that note writing is quite clinical and removed from person centred practice, hence a certain avoidance of bringing up notes in front of clients.

    If these ways of working fit for you, what next steps could you take to build partnerships/collaborations in your work?

    I definitely believe I could continue to use art to help young people tell their alternative stories. In mental health many workers draw thin conclusions of clients – bipolar, poor attachment, violent, with even their strengths really talked about in third person. It would be great to start drawing peoples strengths out with the use of story telling, so that clients can start to own their strengths, rather than have clinicans cherry pick these out.

  2. Thank you to Tileah for a wonderful presentation. I love hearing the word “yarn” used in this powerful way (Americans also have that term). The practice of “translating”, of shifting concepts into language that can be more usefully heard, is very powerful. As coaches we can make good use of this to help clients uncover their hidden or forgotten resources.

  3. These stories are amazing examples of what we can discover when we hold onto our “beginner’s mind” and remember that the other person (client, patient) has the information and understanding, not us. We talk a lot in leadership development about “co-creating” and I think this is a beautiful example of two very complementary roles: the person who has the story and the person who helps to explore and shape it.

  4. I like the idea of narrative – there is something about giving people the power to create a narrative, rather than simply appearing in a story told by someone else. Within the narrative metaphor, I especially enjoy the fabric metaphor – the idea of strands. These may touch each other, or not, may go well together in tone or color, or not. But again, there is some power in creating and weaving the narrative.
    In my own work with coaching and leadership development, I find that the emphasis on narrative(s) helps make things more tangible, and therefore brings them to their true scale, instead of letting them take on imaginary and unclearly described proportions.

  5. I love this. Telling our stories in ways that make us stronger. Such a powerful sentiment. Sometimes through trauma, it is hard to access the words that really encapsulate that experience – though using the written word does help us access those hard to utter parts of our memories … in those cases though perhaps the story we tell ourselves is not one that makes us feel strong in the first instance – so finding a way to tell that story in a way that focuses on the strength of surviving to tell that story is just amazing!

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