school counselling

Posted by on Nov 12, 2016 in | 0 comments

Showing all 4 results

  • Exploring feminist narrative practice and ethics in a school setting— Carolyn Markey

    $9.90

    This article recounts an example of working with a young female student who’d been referred for ‘needing to build resilience’ after being subjected to male peer abuse. The article explores ways of honouring the intent of the original referral, and broader family concern, while also broadening out the conversation from one of working with an individual young woman, to working with a group of young women students, to then engaging a group of young men in respectful conversations about abuse and harassment. In the process, the young men find ways of speaking about abusive actions they have taken, while the young women create a platform for taking broader cultural action on issues of gender and sexuality diversity in the school. Along the way, subtle dilemmas of feminist and narrative ethics are explored.

  • Reducing collusion with individualism and dichotomous thinking: Exploring the constructs of ‘confidentiality’ and ‘disclosure’ through forums and interviews— Adam Hahs and Milan Colic

    $9.90

    The idea of sharing stories so people can be more political with them is not a new idea to narrative therapy. However, as far as we are aware, there is very little research or documentation in the counselling literature that has asked groups of people their opinion about sharing their stories outside of the counselling arena for individual and broader collective good. In many instances, the constructs of ‘confidentiality’ and ‘disclosure’ can be referred to in rather fixed terms, and as non-negotiable entities. This paper outlines the development of forums and interviews with 62 young people in our respective counselling contexts – two co-educational high schools in Melbourne, Australia, to provide us with an indication of how the young people we consult with may feel about ‘confidentiality’ when viewed alongside their right to be supported in sharing their stories.

  • Using Letters in School Counselling— Katy Batha

    $9.90

    This paper explores the creative use of therapeutic letters in a school counselling context. A number of different types of therapeutic documents are described including letters of introduction and invitation, letters of reflection, letters to keep contact, and letters to summarise co-research.

  • Remembering Meg— Anne Stringer

    $5.50

    This paper describes how a group of young women, in conversation with their school counsellor, found ways to remember and honour the mother of one of their close friends. The paper has been written collaboratively between the school counsellor and the young women involved. It is shared here in the hope that it may offer something to other young women and to other school counsellors.

1,961 Comments

  1. “Narrative therapy doesn’t believe in a ‘whole self’ which needs to be integrated but rather that our identities are made up of many stories, and that these stories are constantly changing.”

    I like this, I find it very compatible with my beliefs as a Buddhist. In Buddhism, as I understand it, mistaken beliefs about a solid, fixed “self” are the source of our suffering.

    I work with couples using EFT for couples, and in that approach, there is a big emphasis on externalising the problem as “the cycle that you get trapped in”, and encouraging couples to come up with their own name for it.

  2. Thank you for this. I am a counsellor, and trying to make as much as possible of my notes “in quotes”, that is, writing down things that the clients said. And not my own opinions.

  3. Thank you for this overview of Narrative Therapy. I am returning to practice after some time away, and these reminders are timely and appreciated.

  4. Hi Chris

    I really enjoyed watching your video about Narrative Walks. My project is based in Blaenau Gwent, in South Wales, Uk. I’m wondering whether I might use such an approach in my work with our Youth Service, who support young people between the ages of 11 and 25. Have you any thoughts on this? Are there any resources available, either free or to purchase?

    Best wishes

    Paul

    • Hi Paul, m

      Much of my early attempts of the program were with the 15-20 year old age bracket and I found it worked really well. When I recently had an opportunity to run the program again with this age bracket – I extended the finish time so that could spend more time at the stop points and have a fire at the last resting place to talk about our intentions after the walk. This meant that we used head torches for the 2km which added a bit of a sense of theatre to the day. It was pretty cool.

      If you email me on hello@embarkpsych.com I can send you the manual. Or ask any other questions via this page so others might share in the answers.

      CD

  5. Thank you for sharing your insights. This has been very enlightening as a student studying post-grad social work. Recently my tutorial group was discussing how professionals often use their interpretation and that clients may not get to see how some professionals interpret their stories, in this way many things can be missed especially what the client sees as being important.

0