Re-membering Conversations

An introduction to re-membering conversations from Tileah

 

Re-membering reciprocal relationships

Chris Dolman

 

A reflection from Aunty Barbara Wingard

Now, please read a reflection from Aunty Barbara about Chris’ video:

Bringing lost loved ones into our conversations: Talking about loss in honouring ways.

 

Story of practice: Re-membering conversations

Tileah Drahm-Butler

 

Who’s your mob? Aboriginal mapping: Beginning with the strong story

This article by Justin Butler describes ways in which his conversations are guided by Aboriginal worldviews and narrative therapy:

Who’s your mob? Aboriginal mapping: Beginning with the strong story by Justin Butler

 

Saying hullo again when we have lost someone we love

This chapter, by David Denborough, explores ways of Saying hullo again when we have lost someone we love

It’s from a book called ‘Retelling the stories of our lives: Everyday narrative therapy to draw inspiration and transform experience’

 

Having a yarn with those who’ve passed on

This short piece of writing by Carolynanha Johnson is about having a yarn with those who have passed on.

 

Creative letters to Elders of my past and present

Annette Dudley

In this video, Annette describes a project about writing letters to significant Elders who have influenced her life journey.

 

Re-membering practices

Now, please read this article from Paul Martin about Re-membering Practices.

 

Reflections from Tileah

This Post Has 83 Comments

  1. leah.hopton

    ‘Saying hello again when we have lost someone we love’ seems like such a refreshing way of grieving. Society traditionally has encouraged us to remain serious and sad for an appropriate length of time before putting the loss behind us – as though it’s possible to then turn and walk away from the person who meant so much to us and not think of them again. Saying hello again through narrative practice turns this upside down, by encouraging people to think about and remember their lost loved one/s, their relationship and their experience of being with that person. I was particularly moved by the idea of looking at yourself through the other person’s eyes to ask “what would they notice that you that you could appreciate?”. It’s the next best thing to having them back in the room with you, allowing them to be remembered and celebrated and for the love and connection to be sustained.

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