Narrative gatherings – an Aboriginal invention

Narrative gatherings: An Aboriginal invention

Tileah Drahm-Butler

Tim Agius

Tim Agius tells the story of the first narrative gathering: Reclaiming our stories, reclaiming our lives – a gathering for Aboriginal families who  had lost a loved one to a death in custody.

Further gatherings

After the first narrative gathering at Camp Coorong, further gatherings took place in other communities:


Click here to read about the Narrandera Koori Community Gathering

Sharing stories between communities

In recent years, narrative practice has been used to assist communities who are going through hard times to share their stories to assist other communities who are also struggling. This can bring a sense of pride in the midst of struggle.


Click here to read the article about sharing stories between communities

Yia Marra: Good stories that keep spirits strong

You can read here stories from Ntaria community – Yia Marra: Good stories that keep spirits strong.


Click here to read Yia Marra

Aunty Barbara Wingard

Every story is precious

A reflection from Tileah


This Post Has 28 Comments

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    Sandra Owen

    I found the journey through the course really empowering and enjoyed the narratives that were shared openly with us. Thank you for allowing me to be a part of your narrative as I have listened to your stories which have added to my knowledge and therefore made it possible to offer a better experience to those who listen to my narratives as a result of this experience.

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    rosekneild@yahoo.com.au

    THank you for compiling this excellent course. i am left with a desire to work harder at my listening! TIme and again, people reported how helpful it was to feel heard.

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    Eugene Ford

    I’m currently completing the Diploma of Indigenous Studies with Camosun College in Victoria, on Vancouver Island in Canada. Many of my peers and teachers are Indigenous, and it has been deeply moving and humbling to hear of their struggles with living “in two worlds”, satisfying their need to be formally recognized by educational institutions on one hand, whilst feeling that they have lost Indigenous teachings of their own, on the other. Tim’s comment about not wanting to move into academia, due to feeling that higher education is a colonial institute in and of itself, was deeply powerful and reminded me of what I have heard and witnessed throughout my involvement in the IST program. Tim’s presentation was really moving. Thank you!

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    Kate Coomber

    I was watching Tim Agius talk about the first narrative gathering and was struck by his stated belief that he did not wish to be an academic due to the necessary intake and participation in white culture, the Westminster system and what is valued by western culture. It was a solid reminder to always stand outside as a narrative therapist, to celebrate and seek the alternative, deeper story and not buy into the dominant loud voice that denies that richer, thicker one.

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    adesjardinsdaily@gmail.com

    I really appreciated hearing Tim Agius speak about the narrative gatherings. As did my partner whom I shared this video with since he does justice work within his own Anishinaabe community over here in so-called Canada. What was most striking to me was the importance of community consultations that took place for six months prior to the gathering itself. this was truly a gathering by and for the community.

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    Kathy

    I really appreciate hearing about the response by the community to the problems such as suicide. Providing support in a way that is “coming alongside” opposed to imposing external ideas and solutions is a helpful reminder. Many times we are well-intended in our desire to help. However, we don’t stop to ask and listen to what the community views are the main issues nor most culturally appropriate solutions. As an outsider, it is vital we show respect and treat people as the expert of their own lives.

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    Kathy Pascale

    I really appreciate hearing about the response by the community to the problems such as suicide. Providing support in a way that is “coming alongside” opposed to imposing external ideas and solutions is a helpful reminder. Many times we are well-intended in our desire to help. However, we don’t stop to ask and listen to what the community views are the main issues nor most culturally appropriate solutions. As an outsider, it is vital we show respect and treat people as the expert of their own lives.

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    Andréa

    “We need to really listen to what people are saying, not what we think they’re saying.” – Aunty Barbara Wingard

    this is a lesson that I’m going to remember

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