Free articles

Enjoy our selection of free articles from the International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work. 


Showing 1–10 of 32 results

  • All my relations: Re-membering and honouring those who come before and after us— Angela Voght

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    I write this article not to step into an expert role as a narrative therapist or to speak for all First Nations People, but rather to share my experiences of narrative practices and how they helped to reclaim my relationship with my mom 26 years after her death. I write this, too, as a personal account of reclaiming my identity as a First Nations woman. I do not wish to speak in an instructive way that would suggest all people should reclaim their identity in this particular fashion, but rather to explain the impact on me as I restored parts of my story that had been lost to a modern dominant cultural worldview that often overlooks the importance of stories. Another important focus of this article is how knowledge drawn from both First Nations Cultures and Narrative Practice has influenced my work with people who are dying and their families. The weaving of these knowledges brings a different strength and a new pattern emerges.


  • Deconstructing Love in the Context of Sexual Abuse— Sue Mann

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    This reflection explores the complex realm of the experiences of women who were subjected to sexual abuse as children. Many of the circumstances of childhood sexual abuse can contribute to considerable confusion about understandings and experiences of love, as abuse often occurs in contexts which are described as loving. In some circumstances the person who has abused has, on occasions, also been loving to the child. This short piece offers some reflections on options for therapists in responding to women in these circumstances.


  • Illuminating Experiences, Skills and Knowledges around Suicide: An Invitation to Practitioners: From Marnie Sather, David Newman and Dulwich Centre

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    This project aims to assist individual’s families and clinicians in navigating the loss of a loved one through suicide. I (Marnie) lost my husband from suicide in March 2004. The process of swimming through the waters of shame and guilt has been rocky and sometimes I’ve been swept out by the strong currents. Now, with this project, we hope to collectively come up with ideas and actions that will make a difference to others who have lost loved ones to suicide. We hope this project will assist people to hold their heads up in difficult times.

     


  • A Letter to the Feminism Project— co-ordinated by Shona Russell, Maggie Carey & Cheryl White

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    The paper, ‘Feminism, therapy and narrative ideas – Exploring some not so commonly asked questions’, compiled by Shona Russell and Maggie Carey, was published in an earlier edition of the International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work (2003 #2) and heralded the beginning of an ongoing project on this theme. Subsequent articles by Judy Wright (2003): ‘Considering issues of domestic violence and abuse in palliative care and bereavement settings’; and ‘The Mother-Daughter Project: cocreating pro-girl, pro-mother culture through adolescence and beyond’ by SuEllen Hamkins, Renee Schultz et al. (2003), represent ongoing explorations of these issues.

    If you were not a subscriber to the International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work in 2003 it is possible to receive back issues (just contact your local distributer). A number of these feminist-informed papers are also available on the Dulwich Centre website: www.dulwichcentre.com.au


  • Caring about Violence and Our Communities— Amanda Reddick

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    Developing meaningful partnerships and relationships between workers responding to violence and communities affected by these issues requires considerable care and thoughtfulness. In this piece, Amanda Reddick describes some of the thinking that is informing the community engagement she is involved in and the histories upon which this is based.


  • Different Understandings of Love— Angela Tsun On-kee

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    What is love? People’s understandings of love and their attempts to find and create it, significantly influence how they live their lives. This short reflection suggests that examining and deconstructing philosophies of love can open up meaningful realms for therapeutic explorations.


  • Hong Kong – The Place That Shapes My Identity— Little Lit Siu-wai

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    Through an exploration of family history this piece invites the reader to consider the complexities of identity faced by the people of Hong Kong.


  • Who’s your mob? Aboriginal mapping: Beginning with the strong story— Justin Butler

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    As an Aboriginal person, I see firsthand how the dominant culture influences relations of power and privilege through systems, institutions and dominant ideas about best practice. My work involves exploring ways narrative practice aligns with Aboriginal worldviews and how this can support respectful and decolonising practice with Aboriginal people who consult us. In this paper I describe practices that challenge damage-centred accounts that locate problems within individuals and communities. Guided by our Aboriginal worldviews, I work alongside the people with whom I meet in my work to and ways to decolonise our minds and explore multi-storied accounts of people’s lives by starting with and building upon stories of strength using narrative maps of practice.


  • Creating a Counselling Flyer: A Collective Approach

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    How can flyers and brochures for narrative therapy counselling services be created in ways that are congruent with narrative ideas? A range of practitioners from different parts of the world contributed to create the wording for such a flyer in the hope that this will spark ideas and further conversations.


  • Exploring the Meaning of Tattoos— Mike Boucher

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    In this short paper the author describes some of the multiple meanings that tattoos can hold for people, including ‘markings of transitions’, ‘rejecting normalising judgements’ and ‘remembering important learnings’. Through describing the stories of one woman’s tattoos and their meanings, this paper invites therapists to consider the significance that tattoos hold in some people’s lives and ways of taking this into account in the therapy room.